21 Chibok girls freed from Boko Haram after negotiations

Bring Back Our Girls (BBOG) campaigners look on during a protest procession marking the 500th day since the abduction of girls in Chibok, along a road in Abuja August 27, 2015. Photo/REUTERS
Bring Back Our Girls (BBOG) campaigners look on during a protest procession marking the 500th day since the abduction of girls in Chibok, along a road in Abuja August 27, 2015. Photo/REUTERS

Nigeria's presidency has confirmed the release of 21 girls kidnapped by Boko Haram terrorists in 2014 in the northern town of

Chibok.

The militant group kidnapped about 270 girls from a school in Chibok on April 2 that year.

"The release of the girls...is the outcome of negotiations between the administration and the Boko Haram brokered by the International Red Cross and the Swiss government," a presidency statement said on Thursday.

"The negotiations will continue."

Until now only one girl had been rescued.

A vigilante group found Amina Ali Nkeki in May with her suspected militant husband and her new baby.

Dozens escaped in the initial melee, but more than 200 are still missing.

A senior government official in Nigeria told the BBC that it is understood the girls are being held by the security services in the north-eastern city of Maiduguri.

The details of the rescue have not been given but the Nigerian military is currently carrying out a large-scale operation in the Sambisa forest, Boko Haram’s stronghold.

The kidnapping of the girls sparked one of the biggest global social media campaigns, with tweeters using the hashtag

#BringBackOurGirls.