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November 15, 2018

County trains farmers to boost coffee production

An Agricultural extension officer trains farmers in a Farmers’ Field School (FFS) on better coffee husbandry at Gatugi village Othaya Constituency, Nyeri, last year
An Agricultural extension officer trains farmers in a Farmers’ Field School (FFS) on better coffee husbandry at Gatugi village Othaya Constituency, Nyeri, last year

The government has began a liming programme to lower the acidity of soils and improve coffee production.

Nyeri Agriculture executive Henry Kinyua said the government is also promoting bulk purchase of farm inputs by cooperative societies.

Other interventions include formation of coffee farmers’ field schools.

Farmers are also trained on coffee husbandry and collaborating with other stakeholders to improve farming practices.

The average production per coffee bush is approximately three kilogrammes, which is too low in comparison to the potential of 30 kilogrammes per bush.

“The coffee sub-sector is a critical economic driver for Nyeri county towards improvement of livelihoods through income generation, employment creation and enhanced access to food security,” said the CEC.

He said coffee has always been rated highly as an enterprise both for income and food security despite the current low productivity.

Kinyua said they are also supporting cooperative societies.

“For instance, some societies like Othaya and Rumukia have established milling plants and the government is working with them to increase direct sales and also local sales of their finished products,” he said.

In Nyeri coffee farming is practiced by both large and small-scale farmers.

There are about 161 large-scale producers and approximately 90,000 small-scale coffee producers in the county.

The small-scale farmers are organised into cooperative societies for processing and marketing of their produce.

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