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December 11, 2018

Samburu Girls' rescue centre taps solar technology to end water woes

Samburu county commissioner John Korir tastes water from a solar converter at Samburu Girls Rescue Centre as Josphine Kulea and Cody Friesen - CEO of Zero Mass water, look on, Tuesday June 12, 2018. /MARTIN RWAMBA
Samburu county commissioner John Korir tastes water from a solar converter at Samburu Girls Rescue Centre as Josphine Kulea and Cody Friesen - CEO of Zero Mass water, look on, Tuesday June 12, 2018. /MARTIN RWAMBA

An institution in Samburu is looking forward to solving its water shortage woes through a technology which taps water from the atmosphere.

The technology, which the creators are calling Source, taps vapour in the air using sunlight and converts it into water for drinking.

The innovation was launched at the Samburu Girls Foundation Loosuk Rescue Center on Tuesday.

Josphine Kulea, the founder and CEO of Loosuk Rescue Centre, said the girls will no longer have to cover long distances in search of water.

Zero Mass Water, a company from the US, has donated and installed 40 hydro solar panels to be tapping water for the rescue centre's use.

The company's CEO, Cody Friesen said each panel has the ability to yield up to 5 litres of water daily.

"Water that is produced by solar is pure, perfectly safe and well mineralised to bring up the PH. It is helpful for drinking and cooking."

Girls that are accommodated at the rescue centre expressed their gratitude saying they will now have enough time to study.

This new technology has only been installed in 16 countries drawn from five continents.

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