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September 24, 2018

Sarahah App: Savagely “honest” or cyberbullying?

Sarahah App: Savagely “honest” or cyberbullying?
Sarahah App: Savagely “honest” or cyberbullying?

Most of our timelines have been filled with the new Sarahah application messages over the past few days.

The app has become a full-blown craze, taking over the feeds of Twitter and Facebook.

You would be surprised to learn that the app is actually a few months old, and has already been a hit in regions such as Egypt and Saudi Arabia, according to a BBC report.

Most of our timelines have been filled with messages from the new Sarahah application over the past few days. 

The app has become a full-blown craze, taking over the feeds of Twitter and Facebook.

But you will be surprised to learn that the app is actually a few months old, and has already been a hit in regions such as Egypt and Saudi Arabia, according to a BBC report.

Sarahah was created in Saudi Arabia by Zain al-Abidin Tawfiq last year. Sarahah means “honesty”.

The app bills itself as a way to collect “honest” feedback where a chance was offered for friends and co-workers to offer advice, comment on your strengths and weaknesses, or frankly point out problems.

His idea originally was for the app to be used in the corporate workspace so that employees can give anonymous criticism to their employers.

This anonymity is the reason why the app has gone viral, and it is probably a great place to confess what you can never say in person to someone.

But how do you get along using Sarahah?

It’s actually one of the easiest apps I have used so far.

It's simple to navigate through and registration takes less than a minute: all you do is create a profile, which anyone can visit.

Even without logging in, users can visit your profile and leave messages, anonymously.

If they have logged in, messages are still anonymous by default, but users can choose to tag their identity. 

On the receiver's app, all the incoming messages show up in your inbox, and you can flag messages, delete them or favorite them to find them easily later.

The app, if not used diligently, also has potential to be very risky. Reports already claim that a few people used to unfairly target others.

 

Though some users are taking this as a game and fooling around with friends, there are a few evils eyes who are targeting the Sarahah app as a cyber bullying platform. In some cases, users send threatening messages to people.

To some users, this is one fun application where you get to see what others think of you but caution is given to the faint hearted to not try the app.

As a user, I have received messages that I cannot share even with my peers.

In addition, the application is addictive but you can always control your use, report the sender or even uninstall the app. You signed yourself up in the first place anyway.

Whether Sarahah will remain a hit or fade away in a few weeks is anybody's guess, but for now Sarahah is something difficult to avoid seeing on your Facebook news feed. So test your limits and try it out.

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