CREATIVITY

Why we get best ideas in the shower

When relaxed, you are more likely to turn your attention inwards and you can make more insightful connections.

In Summary

•“The calm, solitary and non-judgmental shower environment may afford creative thinking by allowing the mind to wander freely and may cause people to be more open to their inner stream of consciousness and daydreams.”

•Showering may be the one place where people engage their creative side without even knowing it.

a shower head
a shower head
Image: courtesy: Pinterest

Have you ever wondered why some of your best memories and ideas come when you are in the shower?

Creativity, while is a seemingly very vague activity, and a distinct process that can be triggered by a few key factors, there is a scientific reason for that and it happened again today, as I was thinking about writing this article.

According to a study conducted by cognitive psychologist Scott Barry, 72 per cent of people get creative ideas while in the shower.

The study, was commissioned by the German Bathroom and Kitchen Fixtures Company and published in 2015.

Barry’s survey suggests that the sensation of the water spray combined by the tranquility of the showering ritual may help free the brain and stimulate fresh thinking.

“The calm, solitary and non-judgmental shower environment may afford creative thinking by allowing the mind to wander freely and may cause people to be more open to their inner stream of consciousness and daydreams,” he says.

When humans are in a relaxed state of mind, the body produces more dopamine, a naturally occurring hormone that improves the mood among other things.

A place where people can be unburdened (if only for a few minutes) by outside distraction.

So, we allow our brains to shut down, which allows another part of our brain to light up.

Our minds never stop thinking, even when it may not feel like we’re thinking at all.

Showering may be the one place where people engage their creative side without even knowing it.

Experts say engaging in activities like exercise, sleep, listening to music and having a warm shower can trigger this bodily response.

“It’s both surprising and fascinating to learn that people are more creative in the shower than they are at work, with Hansgrohe’s findings reinforcing existing research on the importance of relaxation for creative thinking,” Barry added.

When relaxed, you are more likely to turn your attention inwards and you can make more insightful connections.

If you want to have the “a-ha!” moment, it’s important to let those higher brain functions rest, which we tend to do when we are relaxed.