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MWANGI G

Why insist on staying where you're no longer wanted?

Ruto has insisted on holding on despite all the signs pointing to a humiliating end.

In Summary
  • Perhaps our political class needs to learn that if the people  who put you there no longer want you, then really you should just leave.
You have sat too long here for any good you have been doing. In the name of God, go
Oliver Cromwell

At the height of my partying days I had one friend who was always being banned from the bars and clubs we liked to hang out in.

Never having been banned from any bar or club, I couldn't understand why my friend insisted on going back. 

I like to believe that when it is made clear that I am surplus to requirements, I’d rather go of my own volition than face the humiliation of being forced out.

 

Perhaps our political class needs to learn that if the people  who put you there no longer want you, then really you should just leave.

Since Kenya attained republic status we have had four presidents, 10 vice presidents who were appointed at the pleasure of the president and, under the 2010 constitution, one deputy president who came as a package deal with the president.

Jomo Kenyatta went through three VPs in his 15 years in power and was succeeded by the third and longest-serving, some might add longest-suffering, of them— Daniel arap Moi.

Kenya’s first VP Jaramogi Oginga Odinga quit in 1966 after the dilution of his power and prestige in government and the ruling party. He decided he had had enough and quit to start his own party.

The second VP was Joseph Murumbi. He served from March to November 1966 when he resigned and quit politics diplomatically citing health reasons. Everyone knew, however, that this idealist had become disillusioned with the corruption and intrigue of politics in the Kenyatta government. 

Moi came in and worked hard at not being seen as a threat while building his power base across the country. He survived verbal and physical abuse as well as a movement to change the constitution to stop the vice president from automatically succeeding the president.

When he became president Moi appointed Mwai Kibaki as VP. Kibaki hung on until 1988, but already by 1985 there were moves afoot against him with the whole Elijah Mwangale “political tourist” campaign. After the 1988 Mlolongo election, he was cast aside to be replaced by Josephat Karanja.

 

Karanja barely had his feet under the desk when a campaign to finish him began. The job ended with his utter humiliation before Parliament in 1989 where he was subject of a long parliamentary debate about his character etc, forcing him to quit.

He was succeeded by George Saitoti, the longest holder of the post beating Moi’s 12 years, despite the “pots of ugali hiatus” between January 1998 to April 1999, at which time he should have just walked away.

Saitoti’s end was also undignified. Moi used a combination of aspects of the plays against Jaramogi, Kibaki and Karanja to force his “friend” out and replaced him with Musalia Mudavadi who held the job for two months before an electoral Tsunami threw Kanu out of power.

Of Kibaki’s three VPs, Michael Wamalwa died in office, Moody Awori was rejected by the voters in 2007 and Kalonzo Musyoka served out his term.

Then came the package deal of UhuRuto where Deputy President William Ruto was elected to the job alongside President Uhuru Kenyatta.

Ruto, who is alleged to be an astute political player, has insisted on holding onto the seat despite all the signs pointing to a humiliating end.

If the DP won’t learn from the history of his predecessors, he might want to study the words of  Oliver Cromwell: ''You have sat too long here for any good you have been doing. In the name of God, go!'' 

Of course the words could apply to the whole government. Let those with ears hear.

@MwangiGithahu