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ELUSIVE LUHYA UNITY

Push for Mulembe unity to get to power trivial

The walls supporting the political wooden mud house in the region needs serious maintenance and repair.

In Summary

• It's time to take up responsibilities and know the correct direction and destination the region is negotiating on.

• Indeed, we have level-headed leaders in the region but the political goodwill of some egocentric opinionated individuals have sunk the ship.

COTU Secretary General Francis Atwoli with Senate Minority Leader Moses Wetang'ula during a past event in Nairobi
COTU Secretary General Francis Atwoli with Senate Minority Leader Moses Wetang'ula during a past event in Nairobi
Image: FILE

Mulembe nation politicians —elected and nominated leaders — and opinion leaders time is minimal for political scrambles and blame games.

The walls supporting the political wooden mud house in the region needs serious maintenance and repair.

The journey for the Mulembe nation in seeking unity has had different mantras under the leadership of the late Masinde muliro, Moses Mudavadi, Kijana Wamalwa, and many others.

The recent fireworks by some politicians display a clear line of political division that must be fixed to enhance the economic and social aspects of the region.

Counter accusations will not help. Council of Governors chairman and Kakamega county boss Wycliffe Oparanya is accusing some politicians of riding in unpopular vehicles purporting to reach the "right destination", which is arguable. 

The idea of numbers in politics is essential, particularly for a candidate who wishes to rule the majority. And these numbers have made and destroyed great politicians and leaders.  But the  blame game and vicious attacks only serve the wolf the best option to attack the shepherd and scatter the flock to rule unopposed.

Bad politicking has a dire repercussions on development, particularly the dying sugar and tea industries in the region. The wolf has found space and authority to dominate the flock at any time without mercy.

It's time to take up responsibilities and know the correct direction and destination the region is negotiating on. Indeed, we have level-headed leaders in the region but the political goodwill of some egocentric opinionated individuals have sunk the ship.

If the relevance of those fighting for the community must stand, we should also ask the questions: Is the community incorporated in the Big Four agenda? Is the region laying formidable bases for Vision 2030 to flourish?

Bringing the Mulembe house in order will bring to the fore the interests of area leaders on their unity  push.

Kenya is made up of more than 40 ethnicities. It’s disturbing and trivial to segregate other people in the vision of rising to power. Share the interest of the other to form an outfit that will lay down strategies to foster economic democracy and free will of speech.  

Oluchina Antony, MKU