Schools should remain closed to prevent virus transmission

Most learners have taken up e-learning since they were closed

In Summary

• Adaptation is a whole package that means the ability to survive the climatic conditions of the ecosystem. 

• All organisms need to adapt to their habitat to be able to survive but it seems humans are taking coronavirus directives as a punishment. 

Pupils at a congested class.
CONGESTED CLASS: Pupils at a congested class.
Image: JOHN NALIANYA

In a bid to control the spread of Covid-19, the Ministry of Education through an executive order closed down all schools in order to effect the social distancing directive that’s critical to curbing transmissions.

This was and still remains a very strategic survival call. In the animal kingdom adapt to adverse situations so that they survive, or live, in its new environment. Change is inevitable if we need to survive this pandemic. Our schooling system has been disrupted to enable us to keep safe and stay alive. Disruption of schooling has happened in the past, it’s nothing new.

The basic instinct of all animals is to stay alive. I cringe every moment I listen to politicians lobbying the public and government for schools to be opened with immediate effect at this critical moment. Granted all our lives are at stake here, what exactly is this that is so vital that it warrants us to risk the lives of millions of learners and their relatives in the name of learning?

No face-to-face learning has taken place since then for obvious reasons, how possibly then can anyone claim the leaners are losing something they don’t have yet? 

All organisms need to adapt to their habitat to be able to survive but it seems humans are taking coronavirus directives as a punishment.

Adaptation is a whole package that means the ability to survive the climatic conditions of the ecosystem, predators and other species that compete for the same food and space. During World War 1 and 2, schools suffered closure. This meant that hundreds of children from poor families lost their free milk and school lunches on top of disrupted learning.

To maintain an acceptable level of schooling, most of the educational hierarchies around the world have picked up e-learning as a way of reaching out to most learners.

 

Nairobi