ILLUSTRATORS

Cartoonists have a rare skill that is not celebrated enough

Editorial cartoonists are able to condense many matters in public discourse

In Summary

• Artists should not take political, religious or any other hardliner positions. 

• It is necessary to nurture young artistic talent to pass the skill to the next generation. 

Punguza Mizigo
UNDERAPPRECIATED ART: Punguza Mizigo
Image: STAR ILLUSTRATED

The demand for creative content is dependent on the matter being represented by the artist. The demand for cartoonists is, however, daunting. Art varies in type. It is a thought process from conceptualising the matter and undertaking actual drawing to represent all the facets of the cartoon in a complete and succinct encryption worth communicating the intended message. That speaks of the rare skill of cartoonists.

For instance, editorial cartoonists in local and international dailies are able to condense many matters in public discourse. They are at times are so satirical that the powers even within the editorial circles and external mandarins are left with a saline taste upon the interpretation of the underlying meaning.

These skilful artists, therefore, need to be careful about their manifestations. They need not take political, religious or any other hardliner positions for their work as artistic works, besides theirs, have high influence in shaping the opinion of the masses.

Those that are keen on these works will also acknowledge the pivotal role that the impressions have played on an individual or collegiate societal reflection on ills that afflict it. They move a notch higher to deliberately suggest the pitfalls of the society and more importantly, provide hints of exploration for solutions to the challenges highlighted.

It is, therefore, necessary to nurture young artistic talent to pass the skill to the next generation. In the realms of art, for any artist to be polished, the skill has to be grown in practice over time. This invites for well-thought-out programmes for growing the budding artists of this orientation.

Schools of fine arts need to lead the pack and forge appropriate collaborations with practising artists.

 

Gigiri