ENVIRONMENTAL CONSERVATION

Mau restoration must go on – it's a national duty

It is unfortunate that some leaders take a simplistic view of national, regional and global affairs.

In Summary

• We are all witnesses to the effects of climate change.

• Our forests have been depleted by charcoal dealers and loggers. Our rivers are dying. Yet attempts to save the same are being sacrificed at the altar of political expediency.

A section of the Mau Forest
FOREST PROTECTION: A section of the Mau Forest
Image: ERIC THUO

The restoration of the Mau forest, the country's largest water tower, is a matter that requires sobriety in political discourse. But as is characteristic of Kenyan leaders, particularly those blinkered by the 2022 politics, the matter has been reduced to a Kalenjin versus Maasai and the rest of Kenya affairs.

This grandstanding reflects a warlike attitude of an uncompromising leadership, yet saving the Mau forest is all about good stewardship of not only the water tower but the country at large. It is about correcting a bad decision of inept and corrupt leadership of yesteryears.

It is unfortunate that some leaders take a simplistic view of national, regional and global affairs. We are all witnesses to the effects of climate change. Our forests have been depleted by charcoal dealers and loggers. Our rivers are dying. Yet attempts to save the same are being sacrificed at the altar of political expediency.

Effective leaders think long-term. They are strategic.  The restoration of the Mau water tower is about common sense, not about communities

Sadly 60,000 people will be evicted from Nkoben, Ilmotiok and Ololunga, Enokishomi, Enoosokon, Nkaroni and Sisian. Most of them innocently acquired the forest land they have been squatting on.  It should be realised that their evictions are about saving the nation.