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Kenyatta University has been closed indefinitely following student unrest

The prescription drug relieves heartburn and is sold in Kenya as Neotack.

In Summary

• On October 7, KU students held demonstrations over the university administration’s refusal to extend the deadline for fee payment beyond October 9.

Kenyatta University.
Kenyatta University.
Image: FILE

A Facebook post claiming that Kenyatta University has been closed indefinitely due to student unrest is TRUE.

The post adds that the university was closed after a student riot that lasted two days.

In a memo shared on October 8, KU Vice-Chancellor, Prof. Paul Wainaina announced the indefinite closure of the institution and directed all students to leave the university with immediate effect.

Prof. Wainana said that the university senate had decided to close the institution indefinitely following two days of student unrest that resulted in the destruction of property and disruption of lectures.

On October 7, KU students held demonstrations over the university administration’s refusal to extend the deadline for fee payment beyond October 9.

Press statement from KU on closure.
Press statement from KU on closure.
Image: COURTESY

A memo shared by KUSA chair Joshua Ayika with a memo dated October 7 stated that the protests would go on until all the student grievances were addressed, including a demand for Vice-Chancellor Wainaina to resign, allegedly due to poor leadership from the university’s management.

Ayika confirmed that the demonstration was over the deadline of October 9 for fee payment, stating that the students demanded an extension.

PesaCheck has looked into the claim that Kenyatta University has been closed indefinitely due to student unrest and finds it to be TRUE.

This post is part of an ongoing series of PesaCheck fact-checks examining content marked as potential misinformation on Facebook and other social media platforms.

By partnering with Facebook and similar social media platforms, third-party fact-checking organisations like PesaCheck are helping to sort fact from fiction. We do this by giving the public deeper insight and context to posts they see in their social media feeds.

Have you spotted what you think is fake news or false information on Facebook? Here’s how you can report. And, here’s more information on PesaCheck’s methodology for fact-checking questionable content.

This fact-check was written by PesaCheck Researcher James Okong’o, was edited by PesaCheck Deputy Editor Ann Ngengere and was approved for publication by PesaCheck Managing Editor Eric Mugendi.