STALEMATE OVER ELECTIONS

IGAD condemns Somalia violence, calls for de-escalation

The organisation says engagements should be with a view to agreeing on conducting inclusive, free, fair, transparent and credible elections without further delay.

In Summary
  • IGAD reiterated that a Somali-owned and Somali-led dialogue is the best option out of the stalemate.
  • There was a heavy exchange of gunfire in Mogadishu ahead of planned opposition protests on Friday.
Executive Secretary IGAD Workneh Gebeyuh gives his speech
Executive Secretary IGAD Workneh Gebeyuh gives his speech
Image: MERCY MUMO

The Inter-Governmental Authority on Development has condemned the violence in Mogadishu, Somalia, in the last 24 hours.

In a statement sent to media houses, the organisation condemned the growing hostility and extreme belligerence in political contests in the country.

“The continued impasse over the upcoming elections and the emerging pre-election violence increases the risks of instability and threatens to erode all the gains made in the peace and state-building processes and in the fight against terrorism,” said IGAD executive secretary Workneh Gebeyehu.

IGAD called upon all political leaders to immediately de-escalate tension and re-engage constructively in the interest of the people of Somalia.

The organisation said the engagements should be with a view to agreeing on the modalities of conducting inclusive, free, fair, transparent and credible federal elections without further delay.

IGAD reiterated that a Somali-owned and Somali-led dialogue is the best option out of the stalemate.

“We urge all the political leaders to seek consensus on all outstanding issues. IGAD will continue to engage all political leaders and other stakeholders on this path,” the statement said.

There was a heavy exchange of gunfire in Mogadishu ahead of planned opposition protests on Friday.

The federal government of Somalia and opposition leaders have traded accusations, attacking each other’s positions.

Former President Hassan Sheikh Mohamud accused government troops of attacking Hotel Maida where he is staying alongside his predecessor Sharif Ahmed but the Somali government through its security minister said armed militias were attacking positions of government troops in Mogadishu.

The opposition in Somalia says they don’t recognise Mohamed Farmaajo as president after his term ended on February 8 due to a delay in reaching an agreement on the election model.

Election talks ended without a deal in Dhusamareb town earlier this month after President Farmaajo and regional leaders disagreed over election management.

Edited by Henry Makori