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Counter terrorism: Interpol trains 35 officers from Kenya, South Africa

Such training and data is vital in improving efforts to identify and locate terrorists.

In Summary

•The training covered CBRNE, terrorism financing, terrorist online presence, biometrics, intelligence analysis and the full range of Interpol's policing capabilities.

•A month ago, President Uhuru Kenyatta said Kenya will lead the counter-terrorism efforts in Eastern Africa.

Some of the officers being trained./COURTESY
Some of the officers being trained./COURTESY

Thirty-five officers from Kenya and South Africa on Friday received counter terrorism training from Interpol.

"Two weeks strengthening regional and int'l cooperation," Interpol said on Friday.

The training covered CBRNE, terrorism financing, terrorist online presence, biometrics, intelligence analysis and the full range of Interpol's policing capabilities.

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Such training and data is vital in improving efforts to identify and locate terrorists, carry out successful investigations and prosecutions.

A month ago, President Uhuru Kenyatta said Kenya will lead the counter-terrorism efforts in Eastern Africa.

The head of state told the global community that this will be achieved through partnership with regional governments and partners.

Uhuru said Kenya will leverage on its membership in the UN Security Council to contribute more to global peace and security.

"Kenya aims to provide leadership in the Horn of Africa by exploring and implementing diplomatic measures in counter-terrorism financing and to work with partners in the broader spectrum of efforts within counter-terrorism, as well as to stem other forms of transnational organized crime.

"Through Kenya’s non-permanent member seat at the United Nations Security Council, Kenya further aims to contribute to global peace and security, with the ultimate goal being the attainment of sustainable development for the year 2021-2022," the President said.

A CIA-backed paramilitary police unit uncovered by Declassified UK – known as the Rapid Response Team (RRT) – is at the heart of US efforts to combat terrorism in Kenya.

The revelations coming nine months after one US military service member and two contractors were killed in an Islamist attack on a military base in Lamu are refocusing attention on America’s expanded military and intelligence footprint in Africa.

 Islamist militant group al Shabab attacked the base, used by Kenyan and US forces, in the popular coastal region of Lamu in January.