ENGAGE IN PRIVATE MATTERS

I'll retire from active politics in 2022, says Sankok

The MP mentioned that United Nations has recognized his noble work and that he may be headed there as an African special advisor on the people with disability issues after completing his legislative role in the national assembly.

In Summary

• Sankok says he has done his best having spoken 790 times in the National Assembly

• The legislator says he will be retiring to give way for new leaders

Nominated MP David ole Sankok with his wife Hellen test walking aids used by disabled people at his home in Ewaso Nyiro, Narok county.
POLITICS : Nominated MP David ole Sankok with his wife Hellen test walking aids used by disabled people at his home in Ewaso Nyiro, Narok county.
Image: KIPLANG'AT KIRUI

An MP from Narok county has announced that he will retire from active politics after his five-year term ends in 2022.

Nominated MP David Sankok said he has done his best, having spoken 790 times in the National Assembly and will not vie for any elective post in 2022. He said he wants to engage in other private matters.

“Five years is long enough in leadership for me to implement the ideas that I have. It is time to give room for other leaders to bring in fresh ideas. I have performed my level best and almost exhausting my ideas,” Sankok told the Star on the phone on Thursday.

The legislator said as a democrat, and having former South African president Nelson Mandela as a role model, he will be retiring voluntarily.

“Even if I run for another 20 years, I will be just repeating my manifestos and ideologies over and over again,” Sankok, the former chairman of the National Council for Persons with Disabilities (NCPWD) said.

He came into the limelight for advocating the rights of persons with disability such as ensuring the disabled are given access to government opportunities, ensuring that sign language in TV stations offered, making sure that all disabled are given adaptable examinations such as those with low vision and providing Braille facilities to the blind.

“I believe in giving way for fresh leadership. I retired voluntarily at the age of 38 when I was the chairman of NCPWD, and I was the Sonu President for only one term in 2000-01 and never bothered seek re-election,” Sankok said.

The MP said the United Nations has recognised his noble work and he may be headed there as an African special adviser on people with disability issues.

He assured the Narok youths that he will still fight for their rights because he is a resident.

Sankok said becoming a politician in Kenya is very taxing as many people follow them for handouts.

“What the public forgets is that a majority of politicians earn their income from attending Parliament,” he said.