3,001 HOUSEHOLDS TO BENEFIT

Drought-stricken families in Wajir to get Sh2,700

The cash assistance programme by Oxford together with national government will run for seven months

In Summary

•The money will be transferred through the Hunger Safety Net programme system through mobile money transfer.

•Mohammed Abdi from Oxfam said they are targeting to reach 450,000 people in Wajir by June.

Duba Ousman, 60, one of the beneficiaries at her home in Dambas.
Duba Ousman, 60, one of the beneficiaries at her home in Dambas.
Image: STEPHEN ASTARIKO

Residents affected by drought in Wajir will benefit from a cash transfer programme by Oxford together with the national government.

The 3,001 households will each receive Sh2,700 monthly, for seven months.

The cash assistance will be transferred through the Hunger Safety Net programme system through mobile money transfer.

The programme started this month.

The herders lost their animals during two seasons of failed rain.

Weather forecasters described the drought as one of the worst in a decade.

Speaking on Wednesday in Dambas Village, Wajir West subcounty, Mohammed Abdi from Oxfam said they are targeting to reach 450,000 people in Wajir by June.

The much-needed assistance will help cope with the effects of drought.

A family in Dambas, Wajir West subcounty that benefited from the cash transfer programme.
A family in Dambas, Wajir West subcounty that benefited from the cash transfer programme.
Image: STEPHEN ASTARIKO

The cash transfer has enabled humanitarian actors to help people in the most transparent and accountable manner.

The cash transfers also give beneficiaries the flexibility to address their immediate needs which vary.

Duba Ousma, 60, a beneficiary, said she will use the money to buy food and water for her grandchildren.

The mother of 10 said due to the drought situation, all her children have gone out to look for pasture for six months.

Women pulling jerry cans in Dambas, Wajir West subcounty.
Women pulling jerry cans in Dambas, Wajir West subcounty.
Image: STEPHEN ASTARIKO

She has, however, been left behind to care for their children.

“Although I have one surviving cow, it is too malnourished and weak to produce milk. However, with the little cash, I will buy food and water. I can’t thank them enough,” she said.

“The current drought has lasted nearly two years. The worst I have ever experienced. I do not know how we will survive. Milk has become a luxury.”

Edited by Kiilu Damaris