WITCHCRAFT CLAIMS

Matuga residents call for protection from night runners

Woman says she is separated from her husband while asleep and has sex with spirits.

In Summary
  • The residents said the night runners take control of the village as early as 10pm.
  • They said the trend has become scary as witchcraft activities intensify in the area.
A picture of Kaya Tiwi most respected shrine in Matuga sub-county, Kwale.
SHRINE: A picture of Kaya Tiwi most respected shrine in Matuga sub-county, Kwale.
Image: SHABAN OMAR

Kinarini residents in Matuga, Kwale county, have decried the increase of night runners, saying they give them sleepless nights.

The residents said the number of the evil-minded individuals has grown tremendously and is wreaking havoc in the community.

Led by Amina Yawa, the locals said the trend has become scary as witchcraft activities intensify in the area.

The residents said the night runners take control of the village as early as 10pm.

“Honestly speaking, I can’t remember when I last had sex with my man because each morning when you wake up, you feel very tired like you had it the whole night,” she said.

Yawa said they are mysteriously separated while asleep. She said most of the time her man might either be placed on the floor or her.

“What surprises me is that we sleep on the bed but the following day or late at night we find ourselves separated,” she added.

It is said the female night runners take the form of men to sleep with other women spiritually.

It is alleged that they go for teenage girls and married couples to make them barren.

Faraji Chumazi said bats, rats and cats are always fighting and making noise but when the house is lit they disappear.

“Two wrestling cats might fall on you heavily while sleeping but when you switch on the lights there is nothing,” he said.

Chumazi said how the animals get in is still a mystery, adding that the doors are always locked and there is a ceiling.

The residents called upon religious leaders to intervene and save them from the torture.

Edited by Henry Makori