ON THE RIGHT COURSE

ADAK CEO is confident Kenya will send clean team to Paris 2024

Shibutse said Kenya athletics is a significant source of national pride and international recognition.

In Summary

•On his part, Dr. Yahuma said ADAK has already tested more than 4135 athletes and reached out to 8500 stakeholders in athletics alone.

•He noted that ADAK has also tested 1348 athletes in other disciplines and reached out to 16,512 stakeholders.

ADAK CEO Sarah Shibutse
ADAK CEO Sarah Shibutse
Image: FILE

The Anti-Doping Agency of Kenya (ADAK) Chief Executive Officer (CEO) Sarah Shibutse is optimistic Kenya will send a clean team to the 2024 Olympic Games in Paris, France.

In a speech delivered to sports journalists in Naivasha during an anti-doping seminar, Shibutse said Kenya athletics is a significant source of national pride and international recognition.

“As ADAK, we are advocating for clean sports and we shall protect the integrity of Kenyan athletics to inspire future generations of athletes.

"Our role in the fight against doping in Kenya is essential in creating awareness, promoting transparency and holding stakeholders accountable,” said Sibutse in a message read on his behalf by Dr Martin Yahuma, who is the head of Anti-Doping Education and Research.

She said journalists can contribute to the fight against doping by exposing scandals through investigative journalism and uncovering scandals that are bound to bring ridicule and shame to the country.

“Through articles, interviews, and documentaries, journalists can highlight the importance of integrity and fair play in sports. They can also prompt action from sports authorities and the government,” she said.

On his part, Dr. Yahuma said ADAK has already tested more than 4135 athletes and reached out to 8500 stakeholders in athletics alone.

He noted that ADAK has also tested 1348 athletes in other disciplines and reached out to 16,512 stakeholders.

Yahuma clarified that athletics has been tested more than other disciplines given it is categorised as a high-risk sport.

“We have been working closely with the WADA Africa office which has been very supportive of our programs. We are also working hand in hand with the regional anti-doping organisation to advance the fight against doping,” said Yahuma.

Yahuma expounded: “We have been doing a lot of testing for athletes over the past year to ensure we deliver a clean team to the Olympics. We have also undertaken both testing and education for the athletes and their entourages and the program is taking shape.”

He continued: “We have tested more numbers compared to other anti-doping originations globally and there are athletes who have been tested more than thrice just to ensure all is well. We wanted to do an out-of-competition testing ostensibly to deliver an intelligence-based testing.”

He said they are helping the Olympic team by visiting camps for testing purposes and sensitisation on anti-doping to deliver a clean sport and avert the cases witnessed during the 2016 Rio Olympics.