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Cherono rules Boston

Lawrence Cherono wins Boston Marathon

In Summary

•The men’s race was a sight to behold as Cherono and Desisa nearly ran out of gas as the finish line loomed

•Two-time world marathon champion, Kenya’s Edna Kiplagat had to settle for the second position in the women’s race

Kenya's Lawrence Cherono crosses the finish line ahead of Lelisa Desisa of Ethiopia during the 123rd Boston Marathon yesterday.
Kenya's Lawrence Cherono crosses the finish line ahead of Lelisa Desisa of Ethiopia during the 123rd Boston Marathon yesterday.
Image: REUTERS

Kenya’s Lawrence Cherono shook off stiff opposition from Ethiopia’s Lelisa Delisa to win the Boston Marathon in sprint finish on Monday.

In one of the closest marathon races since 1988 in history, beat Delisa by a second to cut the tape in 2:07:57 with the Ethiopian coming home second in 2:07:59. Another Kenyan Kenneth Kipkemboi completed the podium position in 2:08:06. Last year’s winner Yuki Kawauchi had no answers to the high pace, placing 17th in 2:15:29.

The men’s race was a sight to behold as Cherono and Desisa nearly ran out of gas as the finish line loomed. They battled with arms and legs flailing but Cherono had just a bit more left in the tank and won in what was very nearly a photo finish. The women’s race, the finish was exactly the opposite with Worknesh Degefa leaving no doubt about his intentions to win the race.

 

Two-time world marathon champion, Kenya’s Edna Kiplagat had to settle for the second position in the women’s race as she clocked 2:24:14, behind Ethiopian winner, Worknesh Degefa, who ran away with the title in 2:23:30. Jordan Hasey came home third in 2:25:21.

In only her fourth marathon, Degefa, a 28-year-old Ethiopian, took control of the race at about Mile 4, moving past American Sara Hall. She easily beat 39-year-old Kiplagat, who finished second, and American Hasay to the podium. Des Linden, the American who won last year’s race, finished fifth in 2:26:59.

Degefa, who has a personal record two minutes better than any other woman in the field, opened up an early lead. She held a 14-second advantage about five miles into Monday’s race, during the early, flat part of the Boston course. At the halfway point, she was projected to win by five minutes, with a projected 2:21:21 time.

Among the women in the later waves was Joan Benoit Samuelson, the legendary Maine runner who won gold in the 1984 Olympic marathon. She is celebrating the 40th anniversary of her 1979 victory in Boston. An American was the first winner of the day, with Daniel Romanchuk winning the men’s push-rim wheelchair event and becoming the first American winner of the event since 1993.

Manuela Schar of Switzerland won the women’s race, ending Tatyana McFadden’s bid to repeat. Romanchuk, a 20-year-old from Urbana, became the youngest winner of the event, finishing in an unofficial time of 1:21:36. Schar won at Boston for a second time, finishing in an unofficial 1:34:19. A brief storm swept through the Boston area Monday morning, leaving behind warm, humid conditions and a tailwind for competitors.