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A lone kite surfer all set

Nzioka unfazed with chilly conditions in Cape Verde

He said their biggest challenge is the purchase of the equipment.

In Summary

• Nzioka, who is also an instructor, also challenged the government to invest in the sport that is slowly gaining popularity. 

• He admitted that he will miss the teamwork aspect.

John Nzioka during a training session in Mombasa
John Nzioka during a training session in Mombasa
Image: Courtesy

John Nzioka,  a lone kite surfer to the inaugural Africa Beach Games is unfazed with the weather challenges that await him in Cape Verde.

Kite surfing is an action sport, combining aspects of wakeboarding, snowboarding, windsurfing, surfing, paragliding, skateboarding and sailing into the extreme sport by harnessing the power of the wind controlled by power kite propelled across the water, land or snow.

Nzioka, who departs to the host nation tomorrow, said he is used to the warm conditions and the cold weather on the other side will be a bit of a challenge 

 

" I am well psyched up for the conditions in Cape Verde and I will try to give the event my best shot. I have armed myself with a wetsuit ahead of the event and I know I will be good," he added.

 "I will give it my all to ensure I return home with a medal if not with my head held high. I am humbled that I will be the only Kenyan representative in the sport. I  have worked on my speed control and I am now ready to compete.  For the past two months, I have been working on my strength and the technical aspect of the game and I’m good to go,” he noted. 

  He added: “Like any other person from this region, we are used to the warm condition.  The Indian Ocean is not rough like Atlantic and as much as I’m not worried about the cold weather on the other side, I look forward to the experience too."

He, however, admitted that he will miss the teamwork aspect. "Like anyone else, I would like to be pushed and challenged to give my best," he noted. 

Nzioka, who is also an instructor, also challenged the government to invest in the sport that is slowly gaining popularity. 

“The sport is here but there is little being done to nurture talent. We need to capitalise on the alternative disciplines to ensure the country is well represented at both the Olympics and other world events.

He said the government and other stakeholders need to organise competitions at the grassroots in a bid to kick start the sport. He said their biggest challenge is the purchase of the equipment.