CALL FOR DISCIPLINE

Churchill: I don't want to bury another comedian

He urged comics to focus and make their families happy.

In Summary

• Veteran told comedians fans stop following them the moment they stop being funny

Comedian Churchill.
Comedian Churchill.
Image: COURTESY

Comedian Churchill on Saturday gave a stern warning to comedians and all public figures to stop calling social media users family.

Speaking during the late comedian Othuol Othuol's burial on Saturday, Churchill told comedians to stop frustrating their families.

"Becoming a brand calls for discipline and consistency, just like the way you can be in Alliance but that does not mean you will get an A," he said.

 
 
 
 
 

Churchill said comedians should rather use the online platform as a channel to create and share their content.

"My word to comedians and all creatives is to stop calling your fans family," he said.

"Stop waking up and telling them what you are eating, what you are dressing on, and know that you have a life and your family is your mum, your sibling and relatives.

"Stop frustrating them. The moment you stop being funny, the social media fans stop following you and being your family."

He also advised against giving blogs their personal life stories.

"Blogs are earning through your stories. Grow your fans and money will follow you. And when you make your brand, grow it, be disciplined enough."

Churchill said despite being a brand in the industry, he still wakes up at 4am to go to work.

 
 
 
 
 

"I should have quit," he said, adding that he does not want to attend another burial function.

"Just hold on and focus and make your family happy. May God bless all the comedians and I give you my blessing. Go out there and most importantly, make God happy by inspiring more talents, just like you have been given a chance."

Churchill finished his speech by praying for all the comedians.

During Othuol's tribute episode last week, Churchill said keeping up with social media is the main challenge facing comedians as most are under pressure to remain relevant.

"You have to feed this animal called social media every day. You have a whole family and the expectation becomes so much," he said.

He urged Kenyans to help comedians wherever they can as some of them are going through so much pressure from the industry.

"At times, it takes a nation to build a comedian. The appreciations heal the soul and if they give you the laugh, give them the love."

Edited by T Jalio