RECOVERY EFFORTS

ALOYS MICHAEL: Tourism sector should focus on local markets

It is a key pillar of the vision 2030 agenda for sustainable development

In Summary

•It's time the government take responsibility to ensure both private and government agencies work together to boost our economy.

•Also, more funds should be allocated to improve infrastructures and re-energize systems as per the big four agenda and vision 2030.

A cook serves food to foreign tourists during the Ocean beach resort and spa Malindi brunch
A cook serves food to foreign tourists during the Ocean beach resort and spa Malindi brunch
Image: ALPHONCE GARI

The country's tourism sector is pegging its recovery on the domestic segment as other markets slowly open up.

Performing at the rate of 40 per cent is a clear indication that all is not well in this sector that contributes over 15 per cent of our GDP.

The sector is a key pillar of the Vision 2030 agenda for sustainable development, energising seventeen sustainable development goals including the creation of job opportunities, improving infrastructures and helping in the preservation of natural and cultural heritage.

Over 1.2 million jobs have been lost during the Covid-19 pandemic putting employees and firms in a difficult financial position to meet their motives.

With 305,635 tourists visiting Kenya now, it is a great breakthrough towards the projected 2024 full recovery plan. However, the sector faces challenges such as the new covid variant.

Another deluge is the danger of drought and hunger in the country with 65 per cent not affording three meals a day meaning there will be a shortage of food hence increased values of products

Ensuring a fair distribution of jabs, vaccinating all and producing products that are friendly to Kenyans and cutting park fees by 50 per cent will enable more people to visit them.

The hospitality and transport sector also contribute to making tourism what it is.

In, Kenya we are one of the major exporters of hospitality and for tourism to be alive, there must be food for visitors and that should be at favourable prices.

High transportation cost adversely affects the overall performance of this sector.

Another challenge is the danger of drought and hunger in the country with 65 per cent not affording three meals a day meaning there will be a shortage of food hence increased cost of living.

The beauty of Kenya is in its diversity and resources endowment.

However, greed for money and poverty can't allow us to take care of our wildlife.

Among other vital metrics in this sector, deforestation and climatic conditions are a slap towards the realisation of Kenya wildlife objectives.

It's time the government takes responsibility to ensure both private and government agencies work together to boost our economy.

To encourage local and even international tourists, their safety must be guaranteed, observe Covid-19 protocols and punish those who are defiant.

Also, more funds should be allocated to improve infrastructures and re-energise systems as per the Big Four agenda and Vision 2030.

 

Communication and media technology student, Maseno University

 

Edited by Kiilu Damaris