'WE NEED YOU MORE'

NGUKA PETER: Applaud efforts by churches in fighting corruption

Let us endeavour to take part in the process of nation-building

In Summary

•The good work of Samuel Kobia at NCIC, Suzzane Silantoi in public policy advocacy and that of PLO Lumumba in his widespread fight against corruption across the continent is worth appreciating.

•To do away with corruption and good governance restored, the efforts of the church cannot be gainsaid.

On February 3, the executive director of Loyola Centre for Media and Communications, Elias Mokua, wrote a very interesting article published in the Standard newspaper.

His article was a result of Rev Canon Sammy Wainaina’s tough sermon on how corruption was chewing the soul of Kenya.

He had been concerned with President Uhuru Kenyatta’s public submission that at least Sh2 billion was being lost to corruption daily from the government.

Such utterances were worth talking about and consequently writing about, however, it is Mokua's submission on the relationship between the church and politics which I partly disagree with.

Even though towards the conclusion, he tried to encourage the coexistence of the two, he had long created a picture of division, lack of understanding and inability to work together.

I am not in any way denying the existence of commercialisation of the Holy Spirit, but I am of the idea that if we dwell so much on this subject and we fail to accord credits to efforts by the church to help in sound governance, we shall be missing the point.

The church and politics summit recently conducted in the country is commendable.

The good work of Samuel Kobia at NCIC, Suzzane Silantoi in public policy advocacy and that of PLO Lumumba in his widespread fight against corruption across the continent is worth appreciating.

To do away with corruption and restore good governance, the efforts of the church cannot be gainsaid.

History has shown that the voice of the church has always received some respect from society on morality.

The happenings of the 80s and 90s will remind us of the strong involvement of the church in fighting for multiparty democracy in Kenya.

I will be regarded as selfish if I was concerned about the quantity of my ink without reminding you of the martyrdom of Bishop Alexander Muge and the struggle of Bishop David Gitari, Bishop Henry Okullu and Rev Timothy Njoya which largely contributed to the constitutional freedoms that we enjoy today.

The words of John Lewis would be most appropriate to conclude this article, “Our lives begin to end, the day we become silent about the things that matter.”

Therefore, let us endeavour to take part in the process of nation-building and speak out whenever it is evident that the direction has changed and the course is no longer for the common good.

To the church, it is evident that your contribution is very pertinent in the quest to end corruption, we need you more than ever before!

Sunday Service coordinator, University of Nairobi

 

Edited by Kiilu Damaris