COVID-19 SURVIVAL

Usual toxic political contests the last thing citizens need fight

Politicians must restrict themselves to the narrow lane of how society can best tackle the menace

In Summary

• It's clear the virus is posing serious inconveniences to the masses many of whom depend on daily wages.  

• Government must carefully vet those tasked with the distribution of essentials to keep off know-it-all gangsters controlling the estates. . 

Former Kakamega Senator Bonny Khalwale during Kibra's by-election last year in November.
'BEDROOM' POLITICS: Former Kakamega Senator Bonny Khalwale during Kibra's by-election last year in November.
Image: COURTESY

While the common mwananchi is more concerned about their survival in the heat of the Covid-19 outbreak, politicians seem to be more occupied with their usual narrow political agenda going by their reckless statements coming at a time of great uncertainty.

The economy has received an unprecedented beating that for any politician to start filling our ears with hollow topics such as referendum after coronavirus is to be utterly irresponsible and myopic.

The virus effect will be with us for a long time and every effort will be needed to pull through the wobbly state of our economy. What the people need now is not toxic political contests but thinking around helping them get over this situation.

Politicians must, therefore, restrict themselves to the narrow lane of how society can best tackle the menace without digressing to some of the uncalled for innuendoes and chest-thumping we have witnessed during recent media interviews.

It's clear the virus is posing serious inconveniences to the masses many of whom depend on daily wages. Every leader in the world is turning to God for help even as science is trying to get a solution. We, therefore, must desist from mocking God by trying to cast aspersion against those who have, in the past, stood with God's word.

Saying that those who used to take their money to church should now help people is to infer that the word of God has stopped. We need the word now more than ever. Then the government must carefully vet those tasked with the distribution of essentials.

So far the little that has reached the ground, mostly from individual philanthropists has been hijacked by the noisy, know-it-all gangsters controlling the estates. That leaves the well-intentioned initiatives at the behest of the marauding groups. They may not reach the intended people which will be sad given what the majority is going through.

 

Economic and political analyst