'STILL THE BOSS'

Plot to eject Sonko began as far back as when he took office

Without major functions, City Hall is just an empty shell that cannot stand on its own

In Summary

• Sonko started fighting everybody who didn't see things his way, gathering not only powerful enemies but also a lot of dirt when he took office. 

• City needed a quick remedy but the party and leadership that sponsored the governor never found it necessary to call for party meetings to deal with the crisis

Nairobi Governor Mike Sonko signs the agreement at State House, Nairobi on February 25.
TAKEOVER: Nairobi Governor Mike Sonko signs the agreement at State House, Nairobi on February 25.
Image: PSCU

Contrary to what the almost deposed and marooned Nairobi Governor Mike Sonko asserts that he is still the boss at City Hall, it is a foregone conclusion that he is not and will not be in a foreseeable future. Indeed, what he needs to know is that the scheming to have him toe the line or be removed started as far back as after the election.

He wasn’t the choice of those who purport to control Nairobi. But Sonko, with all the drum-beating about how former Governor Evans Kidero was running down the capital city, didn’t vindicate himself either. He started fighting everybody who didn’t see things his way, gathering not only powerful enemies but also a lot of dirt in the process.

His tired cliche that ‘cartels’ were fighting him would not wash as issues of integrity started swirling around his leadership.  Once he was arraigned and locked out of office by Justice Mumbi Ngugi’s ruling, it was a matter of time before his goose was served after cooking for the length of his active period at City Hall.

This then paved the way for the takeover of key dockets by the national government leaving City Hall a shell that cannot stand on its own. Kenyans would be interested to know that this trend of ambush has come to define President Uhuru Kenyatta’s second term in office. Curiously, they are done in blatant disregard to the existing laws and the Constitution.

First, a crisis that can be handled at its nascent stage – or at best is self-engineered – is left to precipitate to a point of despair. Then the weary netizens are ambushed with a single-sourced decision, citing necessity and public interest. The city needed a quick remedy but its leaders who sponsored Sonko never saw the need to call for party meetings to address the crisis at City Hall.

 

Economic and political analyst