Voting Closed:

PEACE

Shun violence as we approach election D-day

Difference in opinion should not lead to picking up a stone, panga or bows and arrows and attack our neighbour

In Summary

• No Kenyan leader, since the advent of multi-partism has attempted to stay in office beyond the two term limit an act that has helped promote democracy.

• As citizens, we equally have an important role to play in further deepening the country's democracy.

IEBC electronic KIEMS kit during voting on August 8, 2017
KIEMS KITS: IEBC electronic KIEMS kit during voting on August 8, 2017
Image: FILE

Kenya's democracy has come along way from a tyrannical single party rule to the current day when all are free to contest as long as they qualify and meet the criteria set out in election laws.

At the height of its dictatorial rule, Kanu came up with the 'most novel' voting system dubbed mlolongo where those with the shortest queue were declared winners.

The advent of multi-partism and later the enactment of the 2010 Constitution broadened the democratic space giving Kenyans an opportunity to elect their leaders every five years.

No Kenyan leader, since the advent of multi-partism has attempted to stay in office beyond the two term limit an act that has helped promote democracy.

As citizens, we equally have an important role to play in further deepening the country's democracy.

Granted, we all have a right to chose the leader we want, but difference in opinion should not lead to picking up a stone, panga or bows and arrows and attack our neighbour for holding a contrary opinion.

Our courts have proven that election disputes can be handled judiciously. 

It is therefore our responsibility to ensure the democratic gains made are not lost in a singe moment of anger just because your favourite candidate has not won.

To quote Nelson Mandela: " We must nurture tolerance, collective wisdom and democracy."