NOMINATIONS

EDITORIAL: Don't force leaders on voters

Direct tickets an affront to democracy

In Summary

• It takes a lot of financial, physical and emotional investment to vie for any seat be it in the primaries or at the general election. It is only fair the final decision be left to voters.

• Where a coalition has several candidates interested in a particular seat, they should square it out among themselves then present a single candidate

Political parties have been conducting their nominations in the past two weeks and as usual, there must be winners and losers.

They have used different approaches, among them consensus, opinion polls, direct issuance of tickets and the ballot to get their flag bearers.

However, some of the decisions have left party members more divided than united.

The most divisive method of nomination has been the issuance of direct tickets as witnessed in Kisumu, Mombasa, Nairobi and Siaya, to mention just a few.

Opponents of those issued with direct tickets and their supporters have mostly been ambushed and while busy preparing to vote in the nominations, have only come to learn of the same through the media.

It takes a lot of financial, physical and emotional investment to vie for any seat be it in the primaries or at the general election. It is only fair that the final decision be left to voters.

Where a coalition has several candidates interested in a particular seat, they should square it out among themselves then present a single candidate to take on their opponents.

Boardroom decisions based on opaque opinion polls deny the contestants and the voters their rights.

Worse is when one has not shown any interest in a particular seat but is  brought at the last minute and forced on the voters. Other contestants are then forced or blackmailed to step down.

Voters must have the final right to choose.