LEADER

EDITORIAL: Police service in crisis over senseless killings

The young men and women with whom we entrust our security are themselves desperate for help.

In Summary

• The mental health mess, which has given roots to the senseless killings, must first come under control.

• The police bosses must roll out a speedy medical intervention to save the force as a safe to place work and an institution the public can rely on to protect the public.

Police taking the bodies of three people found in a house at government quarters, Rikana along Jogoo Road to the mortuary on Tuesday
Police taking the bodies of three people found in a house at government quarters, Rikana along Jogoo Road to the mortuary on Tuesday
Image: DOUGLAS OKIDDY

The National Police Service is in a grave crisis. The top chiefs must act quickly.

The young men and women with whom we entrust our security are themselves desperate for help.

They are a real danger to the rest of us hapless, armless public and to themselves.

Without a thorough and ruthless shake-up of the institution, the sickening reports of police officers shooting their bosses, colleagues  and spouses will obviously grind on without a stop.

Inspector General Hillary Mutyambai is on record ordering that off duty police officers should not carry guns.

But an old macho culture seems to defy him every step of the way. He must put his foot down.

There is hardly any plausible way of slowing down the killings and the suicides in the police service without first making sure off duty cops do not have access to firearms.

The mental health mess, which has given roots to the senseless killings, must first come under control.

The police bosses must roll out a speedy medical intervention to save the force as a safe to place work and an institution the public can rely on to protect the public.