COVID DOSES

Delaying vaccination not good bet to make

There is still vaccine hesitancy among teachers, security services and civil service

In Summary

• Around 3.3 million Kenyans have been vaccinated and another three million doses are, or soon will be, available

• Very few negative reactions to Covid vaccination have been recorded in Kenya and not one blood clot

Vaccination exercise by the Nairobi Metropolitan Service targetting matatu operators at the Central Bus Station on September 17, 2021
Vaccination exercise by the Nairobi Metropolitan Service targetting matatu operators at the Central Bus Station on September 17, 2021
Image: MERCY MUMO

Over 3,300,000 Kenyans have been vaccinated against Covid and the country should have 10 million vaccinated by Christmas.

However, only 850,000 Kenyans have been double vaccinated but this figure should rapidly improve as a further 3,000,000 doses of AstraZeneca, Pfizer, Moderna, Sinopharm and Johnson and Johnson are  available, or soon will be. Another 13 million doses of J&J are on the way.

Unfortunately, according to a recent National Security Advisory Committee briefing, there is still vaccine hesitancy among certain groups including teachers, security services and the core civil service.

Yet there have been virtually no serious side effects from administering over three million doses. There has not been one single blood clot in Kenya. Around 600 people reported side effects but these were mostly mild.

Yet we all personally know people who have died from Covid. Often the symptoms are mild but they can also be fatal.

The risk of contracting Covid and becoming seriously ill is far greater than the minuscule risk of a negative reaction to vaccination. Delaying vaccination is not a good bet to make.

Enough doses are now widely available, even in village health centres. So  get double-vaccinated right now.

Quote of the day: "Why do you speak to me of the stones? It is only the arch that matters."

Kublai Khan
The Mongolian emperor was born on September 23, 1215