FLATTENING THE CURVE

Strict curfew will stop Covid spread

In Summary
  • Apart from enforcing the wearing of masks in public, the best way to control Covid-19 is to have a strict curfew
  • Even when there was a curfew here, it was not rigidly enforced
Boda boda operators wait for customers during curfew hours in Bamburi, Mombasa county.
CURFEW? WHAT CURFEW? Boda boda operators wait for customers during curfew hours in Bamburi, Mombasa county.
Image: JOHN CHESOLI

Boda boda drivers in Nakuru are in financial trouble because of the night time curfew. Motorcycles are being impounded by lenders all over Rift Valley ( see p12). Their leaders have called for special treatment for boda bodas.

This is unfortunate but no exception should be made for boda bodas over the curfew.

Last November the curfew was lifted and people were allowed to return to drink in bars. As a result the Covid ‘third wave’ swept through Kenya last month striking rich and poor alike.

Apart from enforcing the wearing of masks in public, the best way to control Covid-19 is to have a strict curfew. Even when there was a curfew here, it was not rigidly enforced.

The Covid wards in Uganda are now largely empty. One big difference with Kenya was that Uganda reduced night traffic to a minimum. The army mounted roadblocks to ensure that cars were off the streets after 8pm and bars were closed. That might seem dictatorial but it was effective.

So if we want bars and restaurants to re-open in Kenya, let’s embrace and respect the 8pm curfew.

Quote of the Day: “Winning is not always the barometer of getting better.”

Tiger Woods

He became the youngest golfer to win the Masters at 23 years of age on April 13, 1997.