STALEMATE

Strike an acceptable compromise on county cash

Lusaka has called for a special sitting, the ninth in under two months.

In Summary
  • Whichever formula senators adopt, it should leave Kenya as one united indivisible nation.
  • There are obviously senators using the stalemate to score politically. How sad!
Senators Ledama Olekina, Stewart Madzayo, Kipchumba Murkomen, Johnson Sakaja, Kithure Kindiki and Enoch Wambua outside the Senate on July 4, 2020.
Senators Ledama Olekina, Stewart Madzayo, Kipchumba Murkomen, Johnson Sakaja, Kithure Kindiki and Enoch Wambua outside the Senate on July 4, 2020.
Image: EZEKIEL AMING'A

In recent weeks, the country has been treated to endless and unnecessary drama in the Senate regarding the counties revenue sharing formula.

Senators have failed, in a record eight sittings, to conclude the debate that has divided the House down the middle.

For the ninth time in under two months, Speaker Kenneth Lusaka has called for a special sitting to debate and vote on the contentious motion on Monday.

It is time the senators put aside their differences, struck an acceptable compromise and allowed the country to move on.

Counties are on the verge of a cash crisis. Senators must step up and effectively perform their constitutional roles. One of the key mandates of the Senate as provided in Article 96 of the Constitution is to “protect the interests of the counties and their governments.”

There are obviously senators using the stalemate to score politically. How sad!

Indeed, the debate has taken a dangerous ethnic undertone that is likely to leave the country more divided. The debate of us versus them should be condemned, it has no place in modern Kenya.

Vested interests, threats and finger-pointing should have no place in this important national discourse. Whichever formula senators adopt, it should leave Kenya as one united indivisible nation.

Quote of the Day:

“Men who are in earnest are not afraid of consequences.”

Marcus Garvey

The Jamaican political activist was born on August 17, 1887.