WHERE'S THE JUSTICE?

One country, two sets of Covid rules for politicians

Police look the other way when pro-Jubilee policians violate social distancing, blast others with teargas

In Summary

• The Covid-19 containment measures include a ban on public gatherings – that includes political gatherings.

• However, politicians who find favour with the government are allowed to hold meetings freely, while those out of favour encounter teargas.

Former Kakamega Senator Boni Khalwale leaves Hamisi MP Charles Gimose’s home in Vihiga county on July 18, 2020, after police lobbed teargas canisters to disperse people who had gathered to condole with the lawmaker following the death of his mother.
Former Kakamega Senator Boni Khalwale leaves Hamisi MP Charles Gimose’s home in Vihiga county on July 18, 2020, after police lobbed teargas canisters to disperse people who had gathered to condole with the lawmaker following the death of his mother.
Image: COURTESY

The war against Covid-19 has reached a critical stage and politicians are expected to lead from the front.

However, in Kakamega, Vihiga, Busia, Bungoma and Trans Nzoia counties politics has taken centre stage.

Leaders converge not to strategise on how to tackle the fast-spreading virus but to discuss succession politics.

 

Two distinct camps have emerged—the Wycliffe Oparanya-Eugene Wamalwa axis and the Musalia Mudavadi-Moses Wetang'ula camp. 

Both groups are wrong. The ban on political gatherings remains as part of the measures to contain the spread of Covid-19. Sadly, this is being selectively enforced.

The Oparanya-Wamalwa team meets freely while the Mudavadi-Wetang'ula camp has to face teargas anytime they convene.

This weekend, meetings convened by Oparanya and Wamalwa in Kakamega and another held by Kakamega Senator Cleophas Malala and ODM secretary general Edwin Sifuna in Bungoma went smoothly.

However, in Hamisi leaders who had converged at the home of  MP Charles Gimose to condole him following the loss of his mother were forcefully dispersed.

After the uprooting of Kanu in 2002, Kenyans expected a new dawn ending the use of state power for political oppression.

Unfortunately, they were wrong, for the more things change, indeed, the more they remain the same.

Quote of the Day: “You do not lead by hitting people over the head -- that’s assault, not leadership.”

Dwight D Eisenhower

The general (and 34th US president) visited General Montgomery’s headquarters in Normandy on July 20, 1944.