NEW DEAL, NOTHING DIFFERENT

Jubilee-Kanu coalition isn’t the tool to bolster governance

Many Kenyans are wondering what the coalition between Ruto’s URP and Uhuru’s TNA in 2012 achieved.

In Summary

• Our politicians have the tendency to think about the next general election and not the next generation of Kenyans.

•  Kenyans have suffered in the hands of politicians who lack vision and are clouded by personal greed instead of improving citizens' lives.

President Uhuru Kenyatta with Kanu leader Gideon Moi after the party endorsed his reelection at a rally at the Moi Sports Centre Kasarani on May 8
President Uhuru Kenyatta with Kanu leader Gideon Moi after the party endorsed his reelection at a rally at the Moi Sports Centre Kasarani on May 8
Image: VICTOR IMBOTO

The announcement by Kanu of its coalition deal with the ruling Jubilee Party to take their relationship “to the next level” must make Kenyans suspicious of the President’s motive with less than 26 months to the General Election.

This is already confirmed by the replacement of Senate Majority leader Kipchumba Murkomen, a Deputy President ally, with Kanu’s West Pokot Senator Samuel Poghisio.

Majority Whip Susan Kihika was replaced by Murang'a Senator Irungu Kang'ata, a move political pundits see this move as one aimed at isolating Deputy President William Ruto. 

 

President Uhuru Kenya had a pact with his deputy as a coalition partner signed in 2012 between URP and TNA and later in 2017, merging the parties — among others — that gave him the 2017 victory under the Jubilee Party flag.

The fundamental question is whether coalitions really enhance democracy, social justice and political participation,

The UhuRuto first and second terms have been marred with graft allegations, which have claimed the careers of different officials in the Jubilee government.

Coalitions have shown that powerful and connected individuals make a kill in this ‘business-oriented’ formations. Handshakes and other political alliances are just tools for the oligarchs to form the next government. It hasn’t shown any goodwill to unite Kenyans or improve their lives. The richest families in Kenya are those in power or connected to powerful politicians.

Our politicians have the tendency to think about the next general election and not the next generation of Kenyans.

Kenyans have suffered in the hands of politicians who lack vision and are clouded by personal greed instead of improving citizens' lives.

Our economy is doing really badly.

 

Perhaps this reminds us of politician J M Kariuki, assassinated in 1975 and famous for the saying that Kenya has become a nation of 10 millionaires and 10 million beggars.

"Every Kenyan man, woman, and child is entitled to a decent and just living. That is a birthright. It is not a privilege. He is entitled as far as is humanly possible to equal educational, job and health opportunities irrespective of his parentage, race or creed or his area of origin in this land. If that is so, deliberate efforts should be made to eliminate all obstacles that today stand in the way of this just goal. That is the primary task of the machinery called government: Our government," he said.

Many Kenyans are wondering what the coalition between Ruto’s United Republican Party (URP) and Uhuru’s The National Alliance (TNA) in 2012 achieved.  Under the UhuRuto coalition, they promised five stadia in major towns, seven to 10 per cent economic growth and five million jobs in five years. The administration failed to deliver.

Delivered promises include the controversial and expensive Standard Gauge Railway that economist David Ndii thinks has unanswered questions about the cost.

Under President Uhuru, many complain of corruption, poverty, unemployment, and tribalism among many other problems, all attributed to poor leadership.

In the annual Ibrahim Index of African Governance in 2019, we are way behind countries such as Mauritius, Seychelles, Ivory Coast, Namibia, Botswana, Ghana and South Africa with all above 68.5 per cent in areas of peace, government transparency and respect for the rule of law.

While the report showed Kenya is making strides in improved governance,  we are still doing badly in unemployment and insecurity, key constraints affecting good governance. The progress is best where there is peace, government transparency and respect for the rule of law.

Kenya is a calm country but not a peaceful nation. We are like burning charcoal beneath the ash, you can get burned at any time.

Alas is a journalist