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CEC MURDER

Voters mourn, as leaders moan

Condolences are pouring in, fast and furious. Even people who have petted the captors of the county have joined the mourning.

In Summary

• The Friday night murder of Transport and Infrastructure executive Donny Opar, should expose the motive holders. They have been strangling the county for seven years now.

• In 2014, goons on motorcycles murdered a versatile Homa Bay MCA Boaz Ondiek, a youthful politician of promise from Kibiri ward.

Homa Bay killings
Homa Bay killings
Image: STAR ILLUSTRATED

County police may not shine light on this murder. Exposing sponsors of the murderers of a county executive committee member is a tall order, if resolving incidents, like arson, are a taboo.

This time the victim, a county minister, had promised to defend the public interest. He had also said, in a recorded speech, that he was being trailed. He asked the local administration to arrest the suspects. They didn't.

Steakholders hit to preempt the unknown. They struck under the cover of darkness in Kendu Bay, a small lakeside town in the captured county. There was a motive: The AK47 wielders were merely pawns in a high-stake coverup. 

 
 

The county police swear they would 'leave no stone unturned'. But they are yet to turn lighter ones in arson cases where suspects always leave smoking gun. The white car used during the burning of strategic county offices, last year, is at the Homa Bay police station.  The suspect was released on a Sh1,000,000 bond. Who bailed him? The police have not cleared suspicions of high-level complicity in these crimes.

The Friday night murder of Transport and Infrastructure executive Donny Opar, should expose the motive holders. They have been strangling the county for seven years now. 

In 2014, goons on motorcycles murdered a versatile Homa Bay MCA Boaz Ondiek, a youthful politician of promise from Kibiri ward. But no 'stones were turned' to expose the paymasters of the handlers of AK47 that killed Nyaruadh Kibiri.

Yet steakholders continue to intimidate, harass, and compromise those who question their excesses. Public interest is on trial, as whistle-blowers suffer backlash in the fight against corruption.

Condolences are pouring in, fast and furious. Even people who have petted the captors of the county have joined the mourning. They are also moaning poor county governance and security.

Good leaders mourn with their people when bereaved. But there is a crisis of leadership when MPs also moan. Solidarity during bereavement shows concern. But moaning confirms a failure of leadership.

No MP in Homa Bay has the moral authority to bemoan corruption. They knew this in 2014, when alarms of plunder were first raised.  Politicians imposed the same monsters on the people in 2017, in spite of good advice, founded on irrefutable evidence. 

MPs who have petted the Homa Bay monster are moaning. They are desperate like voters who have done what they could possibly do to eject piglanders. What do you make of an MP who complains of corruption in Facebook, like other voters? Absurd does not describe the irony of the duplicity of MPs from the county. 

Migori Governor Okoth Obado, in a trending video, gives an accurate diagnosis of some of the MPs: "They are hypocrites who see the log in other people's eyes while ignoring the ignominy in theirs. They have no development agenda. Their obsession is to appear in photos with Raila Odinga to up their stocks. They can't fool the people all the time."  

Governor Obado, who rarely runs with the current, spoke to a cheering audience at St Martin de Porres Catholic Church in Rongo, last week. The jeers should tell Siaya Senator James Orengo, Suba MP John Mbadi, and others in attendance, that you cannot sell moaning any more.

Some of the MPs are on regular handouts from county executives. They are timid, and intimidated. But some of the MPs aspire to succeed the discredited county leadership.  One set of moral losers want to succeed another.  They exploit the 2022 succession idiocy to confuse the electorate. They have abetted and benefitted from corruption.  

Some of the MPs condemn county corruption for two reasons: Their benefactor, the Homa Bay governor, for example, is no longer paying their rent. He would rather keep the loot for life outside public office.  Two: Some of the MPs are eying the same position to continue the plunder. Some have new sponsors. They are tarring the monster they have petted with the brush of corruption to lure the gullible electorate. The missing link in the anti-corruption matrix is the people.

The people should rise up against these monsters and their accomplices.