DEBUNKED

Misleading: UK motorists not queuing for fuel as Kenyans do

The long queues in the UK were witnessed during the Brexit moment.

In Summary

• The fact-checker has verified that that indeed the long that was witnessed in the UK was due to the fuel shortage as anxiety loomed over Brexit by then, but is not related to the Kenyan issues.

• Long queues have been witnessed in Kenya for the past weeks, arousing complains that have attracted the attention of President Uhuru Kenyatta.

Long queues as motorists run for fuel in UK during the Brexit anxiety.
Long queues as motorists run for fuel in UK during the Brexit anxiety.
Image: SOCIAL MEDIA/TWITTER

The current fuel crisis in Kenya has been felt by motorists and citizens as it has affected their businesses.

Long queues have been witnessed in Kenya for the past weeks, arousing complains that have attracted the attention of President Uhuru Kenyatta.

On Monday, Uhuru signed into law five parliamentary bills among them the 2022 Supplementary I Appropriation Bill (Supplementary Budget).

The newly signed Supplementary Budget unlocks a total Shs 139,752,936,287 exchequer funds for use in drought-related interventions; security operations; election preparedness; fuel stabilization; and settlement of pending bills among other pressing public needs.

A total of Sh34,446,813,295 from the Supplementary Budget has been allocated to the government fuel stabilisation programme aimed at cushioning Kenyans from high cost fuel prices occasioned by the worsening global energy crisis.

The crisis has been criticised by a number of leaders, including Deputy President William Ruto who claimed that cartels and corrupt government officials have colluded to cause the problem across the country.

The fuel shortage came despite an assurance from the Kenya Pipeline Company on Saturday that it had enough fuel reserves in their entire depot across the country to meet demand.

"Our global stock holding is adequate to serve the region, with more ships in Mombasa queued for discharge," KPC managing director Macharia Irungu said in a statement.

Even as the country strives to quell the problem, some of the Kenyan social media users used the opportunity to share photos from various filling stations across the country.

In the end, a number of fake information found its way into the country, including photos taken from other countries some years back.

For instance, one of the images being circulated is the one where vehicles were queuing up outside a BP petrol station in Alton, Hampshire, in the UK, a crisis which was associated with the Brexit.

The fact-checker has verified that that indeed the long that was witnessed in the UK was due to the fuel shortage as anxiety loomed over Brexit by then, but is not related to the Kenyan issues.

In Kenya, the government said that there is enough fuel, and that some of the issues related to the matter is linked to the ongoing Russia-Ukraine crisis.

Therefore, the images being circulated are being misused.


WATCH: The latest videos from the Star