PARLIAMENT GOSSIP

Maseno boundary row elicits odd explanations

The decades-old boundary dispute over whether Maseno town is in Kisumu or Vihiga found its way to the Senate

In Summary
  • Nyamunga said she went to school in Maseno and therefore knows where the disputed town lies
  • Kilonzo Jr asked Nyamunga to substantiate that as he reminded her that going to school in Maseno did not mean the town was in Kisumu.
Kisumu Governor Anyang' Nyong'o during the unveiling of Maseno town.
DISPUTED BORDER: Kisumu Governor Anyang' Nyong'o during the unveiling of Maseno town.
Image: FAITH MATETE

The decades-old boundary dispute over whether Maseno town ('unveiling' pictured) is in Kisumu or Vihiga has found its way to the Senate. Legislators gave all manner of explanations to defend their assertions. Nominated Senator Rose Nyamunga perhaps gave the strangest reason why she believed Maseno is in Kisumu and not Vihiga. Nyamunga said she went to school in Maseno and, therefore, knows where the disputed town lies. She said Maseno has all along been in Kisumu, a fact she was well aware of while growing up. Rising on a point of order, Makueni Senator Mutula Kilonzo Jr asked Nyamunga to substantiate that as he reminded her that going to school in Maseno did not mean the town was in Kisumu.

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Just what is brewing between a first-term youthful MP and the chair of a crucial House committee? The lad recently threw his arms up in the air in protest that the chairman had targeted him unfairly at a meeting. The chair had just called his name but before he could utter or state why he called his colleague, the man went on a rant. He said he was being treated with contempt, leaving members wondering if the fellow was okay or had issues. A member joked that the member could be under a lot of pressure from the dwindling fortunes in a political formation to which he adheres.

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Well, what do you do when you prepare a report and then by the time you are to present it, the facts are completely changed? Members of the Kenya Medical Practitioners and Dentists Council found themselves presenting a report that had already been overtaken by events, much to the irritation of the Senate's Health committee. The report on the Covid-19 situation in the counties based its finding on the facts as at August 14 but was presented four months later. The country was already going through the second wave of the pandemic. Asked why they were giving historical details, members of the council said lack of funds prevented their second visit to the counties.