POLITICAL GOSSIP

'Men in Black' fiasco still haunts ODM

An aide to an influential CS rattles politicians with his moves

In Summary
  • It appears ODM leader Raila Odinga still has a tough assignment in ending divisions that emerged during the internal party elections disrupted by the ‘Men in Black’ seven years ago.
  • A besieged senior official of a fringe political party gasping for breath, could have designed a strategy to cling to power despite threats to kick him out.
ODM party leader Raila Odinga (right) chats with secretary general Edwin Sifuna (C) and chairman John Mbadi.
ODM party leader Raila Odinga (right) chats with secretary general Edwin Sifuna (C) and chairman John Mbadi.
Image: FILE

It appears ODM leader Raila Odinga (pictured) still has a tough assignment in ending divisions that emerged during the internal party elections disrupted by the ‘Men in Black’ seven years ago. Recently, the former Prime Minister’s emissary to a public function at the Coast was barred from giving an address, lifting the lid on the deep-seated divisions. It seems the host is yet to forgive the emissary – a first-term lawmaker of senior rank in the party – for supporting his relegation to a second spot. 


A besieged senior official of a fringe political party gasping for breath could have designed an elaborate strategy to cling to power despite threats to kick him out. The official, regarded as having deep pockets, last Sunday secretly met two members of a rival group at an exclusive club in Karen. The agenda, our small bird says, must have been related to his impending removal. Details of the meeting, which lasted until midnight, are scant but a source indicated that a plan to sabotage a planned National Delegates Congress was canvassed. The embattled official could resort to borrowing a leaf from ODM officials on how to dismantle NDC meetings through the services of the infamous 'Men in Black'. 


The stage is set for a bruising political battle at the Thirdway Alliance after the Registrar of Political Parties declined the National Executive Council's request to expel its embattled leader Ekuru Aukot. The decision by the political parties' prefect means that Aukot is a bona fide member of the party and therefore legible to contest for any seat, including seeking to be reinstated as party leader. The decision, which has given Aukot a political lifeline, has triggered confusion among his adversaries who insist they will not recognise him as a party member. The registrar had endorsed the NEC's other decision to strip Aukot of the post of party leader. It would appear that both factions are bracing for a showdown ahead of a key meeting likely to be convened early next year.


An aide to an influential Cabinet Secretary has stirred debate over his moves, which might taint the image of his senior. The aide harbours political ambitions, with his eyes set on a parliamentary seat held by a vocal Tangatanga lawmaker. It has emerged that the assistant has been diverting some resources entrusted to him by the CS to further his political agenda. Some politicians from his county are now accusing him of engaging in politics to pit leaders against each other. The county governor is the latest to express outrage, amid frosty ties with the CS.