POLITICAL GOSSIP

CORRIDORS OF POWER

A principal secretary is on the spot after it emerged that he has been using the ministry’s human resource manager to collect bribes

In Summary

• Over 270 civil registration officers who were undergoing four-day training at a conference centre in Karen are a disappointed lot

• A parliamentary loser in one of the constituencies in Nyanza is increasingly becoming a thorn in the flesh of his close relatives

Interior CS Fred Matiang'i
Interior CS Fred Matiang'i
Image: FILE

Over 270 civil registration officers who were undergoing four-day training at a conference centre in Karen are a disappointed lot. The senior officers, some of whom are in charge of civil registration in the counties, protested a move by the organisers from their department to have them share rooms, yet the key exercise, which is meant to train them as trainers of trainers  (TOTs) for data entry and digitisation of the registration process, was well funded by the government. They claimed a senior officer pocketed what would have been used to comfortably accommodate them. The registrars are expected to train data entry clerks who are being hired on contract to help scale up issuance of birth and death certificates during the one-month mass registration to clear the backlog as directed by Interior CS Fred Matiang'i recently.


A principal secretary is on the spot after it emerged that he has been using the ministry’s human resource manager to collect bribes from heads of parastatals that are under the ministry. Those in the know have told Corridors that a 10 per cent cut must be set aside from every payment made by any state corporation that falls under the ministry. The cash is then collected and handed over to the PS on a weekly basis. The HR manager is also tasked with vetting all senior employees posted to the ministry and establishing their political loyalty. Those found to be inclined to the 'wrong side' of the political divide are frustrated and forced to leave. So far, two top officials have been forced out.


Were aides to a politician forced into taking the oath of silence? This is what leaders from one of the counties in the western part of the country are asking themselves following the secretive manner in which aides and close associates of a gubernatorial aspirant are conducting themselves. The politician’s supporters are said to be avoiding like plague any discussions around their boss's dirty tricks during the last election. They include the abduction of two youths from a local shopping centre. The girls have yet to be seen almost two years after the polls. The aides rarely share anything from their former boss and whenever a discussion about the former aspirant surfaces, they would do everything to walk away, something that has now thrown their associates into thinking if they took a secret oath of silence.


A parliamentary loser in one of the constituencies in Nyanza is increasingly becoming a thorn in the flesh of his close relatives and friends over what some describe as irritating behavior since he lost the seat. The MP who lost even after resigning from a well-paying job in the city is said to have come with a written list of relatives and friends he believed made him lose the seat. The young politician, according to our moles, goes from homestead to homestead narrating how his relatives supported his opponent and persuaded people to vote against him. In what surprises his kinsmen, the leader has taken the issue so personal to the extent of not talking to some of the relatives in his long list.