CRISIS

Tigray on the brink of famine, action needed - UN chief Guterres

Famine is a double tragedy in the area that has been witnessing fighting.

In Summary

• He said that the situation will aggravate unless the need for funding is increased and humanitarian access is improved.

• Several people have been killed, and thousands displaced following the conflict between the Special Forces of the Tigray Regional government, and the Ethiopian government.

UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres.
UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres.
Image: FILE

The UN secretary-general Antonio Guterres has called for urgent humanitarian action to save the lives of many people in the Tigray region, Ethiopia.

Guterres said that several areas in the region are on the brink of famine.

He said that the situation will aggravate unless the need for funding is increased and humanitarian access is improved.

“The actions we take now may mean the difference between life and death for many people,” Guterres tweeted on Tuesday.

Famine in the region is a double tragedy to the region that has been witnessing a crisis for the last six months.

Several people have been killed, and thousands displaced following the conflict between the Special Forces of the Tigray Regional government, and the Ethiopian government.

The conflict saw the US imposing wide-ranging restrictions on economic and security assistance to Ethiopia.

US Secretary of State Antony Blinken announced visa restrictions on Ethiopian and Eritrean officials and others who are accused of atrocities.

In March this year, Blinken urged Kenyan leadership in working with the US on the UN Security Council and in other venues to address the crisis in Ethiopia’s Tigray region, particularly in light of recent reports of atrocities and a worsening humanitarian situation.

Blinken emphasised the US commitment to working with Kenya to advance their shared interests in trade, democracy, human rights, global health, regional security, and climate change for the benefit of the American and Kenyan people.