Burundi President to get Sh53 million golden parachute

It also proposes that Nkurunziza be elevated to the title of "supreme leader"

In Summary

• Burundi's parliament has voted to pay Sh53 million to President Pierre Nkurunziza and provide him with a luxury villa when he leaves office.

• A new constitution passed in 2018, after a referendum, allowed Nkurunziza to stay in power until 2034.

Burundi's President Pierre Nkurunziza attends the opening of a coffee conference in the capital Bujumbura in this file photo. /REUTERS
Burundi's President Pierre Nkurunziza attends the opening of a coffee conference in the capital Bujumbura in this file photo. /REUTERS

Burundi's parliament has voted to pay Sh53 million to President Pierre Nkurunziza and provide him with a luxury villa when he leaves office.

The draft law, which has been presented to the cabinet for approval, also awards him a lifetime salary.

It also proposes that Mr Nkurunziza be elevated to the title of "supreme leader" when he steps down in May.

Burundi was plunged into a constitutional crisis in 2015 when he successfully ran for a third term.

The move sparked violent protests by opposition supporters which morphed into reprisal attacks.

Last year a UN commission accused the government of human rights abuses, including executions, arbitrary arrests, torture and sexual violence.

Burundi called the claims "lies".

Last year, Burundi banned the BBC from operating in the country, accusing it of producing a documentary that had damaged the country's reputation.

Burundi's parliament has voted to pay $530,000 (£400,000) to President Pierre Nkurunziza and provide him with a luxury villa when he leaves office.

The draft law, which has been presented to the cabinet for approval, also awards him a lifetime salary.

It also proposes that Mr Nkurunziza be elevated to the title of "supreme leader" when he steps down in May.

Burundi was plunged into a constitutional crisis in 2015 when he successfully ran for a third term.

The move sparked violent protests by opposition supporters which morphed into reprisal attacks.

Last year a UN commission accused the government of human rights abuses, including executions, arbitrary arrests, torture and sexual violence.

Burundi called the claims "lies".

Last year, Burundi banned the BBC from operating in the country, accusing it of producing a documentary that had damaged the country's reputation.