CANCER SCREENING

KU hospital kicks off cancer screening services

President Uhuru commissioned the project on October 26, last year.

In Summary

•  The ultra-modern medical facility is equipped with state-of-the-art equipment to offer comprehensive cancer management services.

KU hospital's first patient undergoes cancer screening on Monday, January 10, 2022.
KU hospital's first patient undergoes cancer screening on Monday, January 10, 2022.
Image: MAGDALINE SAYA

The recently opened Integrated Molecular Imaging Center at the Kenyatta University teaching and referral hospital has begun cancer screening services with the first patient having undergone screening.

Patient 001 underwent cancer screening at the centre at around 11.30 am with at least five more patients expected to undergo the process today (Monday).

The centre was opened by President Uhuru Kenyatta on October 16 and aims to reduce the cancer burden in the country by ensuring early detection of cases for timely intervention.

The hospital's board chairperson Prof Olive Mugenda on Monday said the centre targets to attend to at least 50 patients in a day in an organized two shifts.

The centre has two PET/CT Scan machines.

KU hospital cancer screening equipment.
KU hospital cancer screening equipment.
Image: MAGDALINE SAYA

"This will continue for the rest of the day and in another two days, we have decided to be doing two shifts and that way we will be able to scan about 50 Kenyans per day using the two machines," Mugenda said.

She added: "Each machine will scan about 24 people per day but today because it is the first day we are scanning about 10."

 The ultra-modern medical facility is equipped with state-of-the-art equipment to offer comprehensive cancer management services.

President Uhuru Kenyatta during the commissioning of the Integrated Molecular Imaging Centre and Hospitality centre at the Kenyatta University Teaching, Referral and Research Hospital on October 16, 2021
President Uhuru Kenyatta during the commissioning of the Integrated Molecular Imaging Centre and Hospitality centre at the Kenyatta University Teaching, Referral and Research Hospital on October 16, 2021

It covers 635 square metres located on three floors and a bunker for the cyclotron. The key function of the cyclotron machine is to produce radioisotopes (consumables) that are used to prepare the dosage injected into the patient for early diagnosis of cancer through the PET/CT machine.

The centre is able to offer accommodation to at least 100 patients and their families.

“The scourge of cancer has bedevilled the country for decades causing untold suffering and forcing many families to seek cancer diagnostic and treatment outside Kenya. Thousands of Kenyans who have been travelling overseas in search of Medicare will now get quality treatment in Kenya,” President Uhuru said during the commissioning of the centre.

Uhuru said the Hospitality Center at the hospital will ensure families stay closer to their members accessing treatment at the facility further reducing overhead costs.

-Edited by B.Marita