Livestock Bill 2021 suspended for more consultations - Kimunya

The suspension comes following growing concerns across the country.

In Summary

• The MP said that the bill is good, and it does not only cover bees but it covers other livestock

• Part of the bill was seeking to outlaw bee farmers and others from manufacturing any animal foodstuff for sale except under the authority of a valid licence.

Kipipiri MP Amos Kimunya speaks to the press after he was appointed National Assembly Majority Leader of in a Parliamentary Group meeting at KICC in Nairobi on Monday, June 22, 2020.
Kipipiri MP Amos Kimunya speaks to the press after he was appointed National Assembly Majority Leader of in a Parliamentary Group meeting at KICC in Nairobi on Monday, June 22, 2020.
Image: FREDRICK OMONDI

National Assembly Leader of the Majority Amos Kimunya has announced the withdrawal of the Livestock Bill 2021 from being read in the House.

Kimunya said on Friday that the suspension comes following growing concerns across the country.

“The Livestock Bill 2021  is suspended to allow for more discussions within Government and with the stakeholders,” Kimunya said.

He added, "We just need to see what was the thinking in government in terms of bringing these issues and what amendment will be required to make the bill workable. The bill is good, it does not only cover bees but it covers other livestock.”

Part of the bill was seeking to outlaw bee farmers and others from manufacturing any animal foodstuff for sale except under the authority of a valid license issued by the authority.

The bill also sought to punish those who disregard it with a fine of Sh500,000 or face a prison term not exceeding one year or both.

“A person who contravenes section 1 of the bill commits an offense is liable, on conviction to a fine not exceeding Sh500,000 or imprisonment for a term not exceeding twelve months or both,” part of the bill reads.

The bill had said that a person shall not keep bee for commercial purposes except in an apiary registered under the Act.

“A person shall not keep bees for commercial purposes unless in an apiary registered under this Act, own or possess bees or keeping equipment for commercial purposes unless the person is registered under this Act,” the State-backed Bill reads.

It also proposed that;

“A person who intends to be registered as a beekeeper shall apply to the county executive committee member responsible for livestock in the prescribed manner…a person who becomes beekeeper only because of ownership, or the charge, care or possession of bees.”

The Bill also stops a person from allowing bees to be kept on land owned or occupied by the person unless the land is registered under the Act as the location of an apiary.

According to the bill, a licence that was to be issued to farmers manufacturing animal stuff was to be effective for a period of one year,

It had also proposed that any container in which an approved animal foodstuff is sold shall be printed or labeled with the information prescribed in regulations.

It had also proposed a fine not exceeding one million- or two-year imprisonment to a person who sells animal foodstuff containing deleterious ingredients.