Political Parties Liaison Committee meets RPP ahead of inspection of compliance

Inspection will take place on June 21-24, 2021.

In Summary

• Parties are also expected to RPP is also expecting parties to disclose all the financial transactions and records of assets and liabilities of the party and the membership dues paid.

• PPLC has informed the office of the Registrar of Political Parties Anne Nderitu of the consideration that it has to put in place ahead of the inspection.

Registrar of Political Parties Ann Nderitu when she appeared before Public accounts committee to answer audit questions on November.16th.2020/EZEKIEL AMING'A
Registrar of Political Parties Ann Nderitu when she appeared before Public accounts committee to answer audit questions on November.16th.2020/EZEKIEL AMING'A

The Political Parties Liaison Committee (PPLC) has raised its concerns with the Office of the Registrar of Political Parties ahead of the inspection of fully registered political parties in the country.

In the meeting on Tuesday, the committee's leadership led by chairperson Misati met the Registrar on behalf of all the 73 fully registered political parties to present their concerns on the compliance demands.

PPLC has informed the office of the Registrar of Political Parties Anne Nderitu of the consideration that it has to put in place ahead of the inspection, including hiatus caused by Covid-19 that has not spared political parties.

“The government vide various gazette notices banned all political gatherings, an order which is in force to date. The effect of this is that political parties have greatly been incapacitated as regards continuous recruitment of members into their parties,” PPLC said in a statement to RPP.

Also, the committee said that many political parties have not been having active office work following the order from the government to employers and enterprises to allow its staff to work from home.

“The raft of requirements envisaged in your will require scaling up of party staff to achieve reasonable compliance levels.”

Last month, in a letter to all the fully registered parties, Nderitu said that the inspection exercise will take place from June 21-24, 2021.

She said that the inspection is meant to ascertain that a political party has maintained its head office as well as accurate and authentic records as stipulated in the Act, including a register of its members.

Parties will also be required to have a copy of policies and plans of the political parties, particulars of any contributions, donation and pledge of contribution, and the latest audited books of accounts.

During the meeting with PPLC, the party raised the issue on unfunded political parties, arguing that there is no logical basis for accounting for what no one received.

“In fact, ORPP should be in the forefront for fighting for funding of all parties so that the question of audited accounts becomes clear.”

RPP is also expecting parties to disclose all the financial transactions and records of assets and liabilities of the party and the membership dues paid.