Close

TARGETING MISINFORMATION

Twitter's new feature to ask users to read articles before sharing

New feature warns users attempting to retweet an article without clicking on it.

In Summary

• New feature warns users attempting to retweet an article without clicking on it.

• In the last few weeks, Twitter has been putting in place coloured labels to fight off misinformation to the public and this might just be one of the tactics.

People holding mobile phones are silhouetted against a backdrop projected with the Twitter logo. REUTERS/Kacper Pempel/Illustration
People holding mobile phones are silhouetted against a backdrop projected with the Twitter logo. REUTERS/Kacper Pempel/Illustration

Kenyans like most online content users globally are guilty of sharing articles without reading their contents.

This happens when one comes across an attractive headline making them share it with their followers without verifying or reading its content.

But this might soon come to a stop as Twitter is testing a new feature that warns users attempting to retweet an article without clicking on it.

 
 
 

"Sharing an article can spark conversation, so you may want to read it before you Tweet it," Twitter said on Wednesday evening.

"To help promote informed discussion, we're testing a new prompt on Android –when you Retweet an article that you haven't opened on Twitter, we may ask if you'd like to open it first."

Twitter said that they are not testing ad products with these prompts.

"They're designed to empower a healthy and informed public conversation. If you see the prompt, you'll always have the option to go ahead and retweet," Twitter said.

In the last few weeks, Twitter has been putting in place coloured labels to fight off misinformation to the public and this might just be one of the tactics.

Last week, a leaked demo of new features sent to NBC media showed that Twitter is experimenting with adding brightly coloured labels directly beneath lies and misinformation posted by politicians and other public figures.

Twitter confirmed that the leaked demo is one possible iteration of a new policy to target misinformation.

 
 
 

The company does not have a date to roll out any new misinformation features.