MANAGEABLE

Most coronavirus patients recover fully – doctors

The majority of patients across the world have exhibited only mild to moderate symptoms, which clears in a week.

In Summary

• While the number of coronavirus cases has surpassed 127,000 globally, more than 70,000 people have fully recovered, while the rest are receiving treatment.

• Only when they deteriorate will they be hospitalized, says Dr Wilson Aruasa

 

A member of the medical team checks the temperature of a woman, following the coronavirus outbreak, at the entrance checkpoint of Erbil, Iraq March 2, 2020.
A member of the medical team checks the temperature of a woman, following the coronavirus outbreak, at the entrance checkpoint of Erbil, Iraq March 2, 2020.
Image: REUTERS

Most coronavirus patients recover fully and Kenyans should not panic, doctors have said.

While the number of coronavirus cases has surpassed 127,000 globally, more than 70,000 people have fully recovered, while the rest are receiving treatment.

Of the 4,700 people who have died, the majority were older adults with pre-existing health conditions that had already compromised their immune system.

 

Head of the Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital Dr Wilson Aruasa said on Friday the majority of patients across the world exhibited only mild to moderate symptoms.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), these mild symptoms include cough and fever.

WHO said those that experience mild illness typically recover within two weeks, while those who experience a more severe illness could take up to six weeks to recover. 

"Those who are mild and will require isolation will be isolated at home and monitored. Only when they deteriorate will they be hospitalised," Dr Aruasa told the Star.

"Those hospitalised will be placed in isolation wards and will be monitored by well-trained health workers."

He said most of the treatment is supportive because, like most viral diseases, Covid-19 has no cure.

"We are going to manage their symptoms. Most viral diseases will be self-limited in the long run and will clear in a few days," he said.

 

"We support the body to make sure it is well-hydrated, there's no fever and the patient is not in pain. If they have serious breathing problems, we take them to the ICU."

He said less than one per cent of patients end up in the ICU.

Public health specialist Dr Cosmas Mugambi said the death rate is extremely low, and those who succumb often have other health complications. 

"The fatality rate is unknown. We only have estimates of 0·3–1 per cent," he said.

"Infected patients are largely adult males. Underlying diseases such as diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular disease present a higher risk of infection."