POLITICS

2002 Polls: Moi asked me to draft two speeches for Uhuru - Sally Kosgei

During Moi's last term in office, he asked her to draft a speech for him

In Summary

• On a lighter note, Sally recalled how Moi would address her and if he used a different name, she knew she was in trouble.

• Moi didn't like controversy and would protect civil servants if he found out that they were being treated unfairly.

Former Head of Public Service Sally Kosgei
Former Head of Public Service Sally Kosgei
Image: ANDREW KASUKU

The former head of Public Service Sally Kosgei has revealed how she was asked by the late President Moi to draft two speeches for Uhuru Kenyatta.

"He invited me to sit down and I gave him two possible speeches for Uhuru Kenyatta to make. One if the election outcome was to be different from what the president expected and the other just in case things worked his way," Kosgei said.

Speaking during President Moi's final send-off in Kabarak, Kosgei said Moi accepted the speeches and put them in his cabinet then asked Sally questions about how they had arrived at the speeches.

Kosgei further revealed that Moi had asked her to draft another speech that he would read during his last term in office.

This speech she said had only five paragraphs.

"When President Moi was sworn in for the last term in office, I drafted his speech on his instructions. The speech had only 5 paragraphs, three of them starting with the same phrase "In this my last term in office."

Moi's name was not in the ballot in 2002 and he was ready and prepared to hand over power. 

She went on to recall a meeting President Moi had with 43rd president of United States, J.W Bush in Washington where he asked him who he will be handing over power to and he calmly said, 'May the best man win."

On a lighter note, Sally recalled how Moi would address her and if he used a different name, she knew she was in trouble.

"I also soon learned how to recognize signs of displeasure. If he called me daktari, I was ok, Sally was my official name so that was fine, if he received me as 'Lakwani' which means child, in his softest voice, I knew I was in big trouble."

Sally shared how Moi didn't like controversy and would protect civil servants if he found out that they were being treated unfairly.

 
 

"If you were a civil servant, you were well advised to stay out of controversy with politicians. He would quietly protect you if he knew you were being attacked unfairly but he preferred that you did not pick up fights with politicians," she said.

 
 

She added that as senior civil servants, they worked closely, consulted each other and made their work easier.

"We in fact became big consumers of intelligence and we debated with each other every day on everything but everything had to be confidential. Leaking of information was out of the question."

She concluded by expressing how privileged she feels to have work with Moi as an ordinary civil servant for 5 years, as an ambassador for 6 years, a permanent secretary for 10 years and as his head of public service for 2 years.

"I will always remain grateful to President Moi for his generosity, support, professionalism and above all respect."