ITS BACK!

(Photos):Throwback as Kenyans celebrate Moi Day

Moi had declared October 10 a public holiday in his name.

In Summary

• President Moi would join Kenyans from all walks of life to mark a day that was so dear to him throughout the last decade of his 24-year rule.

Maziwa ya Nyayo./COURTESY
Maziwa ya Nyayo./COURTESY

From Moi's milk to old Moi notes, Kenyans have posted some of the memories they shared to celebrate this public holiday.

Former President Daniel Arap Moi had declared October 10 a public holiday in his name and Kenyans would take a break from work to honor his accomplishments since taking office in 1978.

President Moi would join Kenyans from all walks of life to mark a day that was so dear to him throughout the last decade of his 24-year rule.

To celebrate this day, some Kenyans posted 'Maziwa ya Nyayo' on Twitter as a remembrance of the old good times.

This was the name of Moi's free milk programme that was introduced in 1980 and was fully funded by the government.

Maziwa ya Nyayo
Maziwa ya Nyayo

But it came to a halt in 1996 due to apparent lack of funding and logistical support.

Some Kenyans posted currencies that were having Moi's portrait. 

Kenyan notes were redesigned and emblazoned with Moi's face to usher in his era.

Old notes./COURTESY
Old notes./COURTESY

After removal of Moi's from the Kenyan currency, Kenya voted in the 2010 constitutional referendum to get rid of individual portraits on the money.

 

In December 2018, President Uhuru Kenyatta and CBK Governor Patrick Njoroge unveiled new generation coins.

Here are some of the posts shared by Kenyans on Twitter to celebrate this Moi Day; 

President Moi in a past event./COURTESY
President Moi in a past event./COURTESY

Until October 2002, the day was marked with fanfare including elaborate military parades punctuated by patriotic and praise songs.

Moi would take a lap around the stadium in a military Land Rover with a contingent of security forces matching side by side in a show of might and power as he lifted his signature rungu to salute Kenyans.

The return of Moi Day that has been dogged by years of controversy, rekindles memories of the three decades in which Moi used his trademark baton to rule.