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PREVENTION AND TREATMENT

Health ministry receives Sh450 million to fight cancer

Money will will be used for cancer screening and treatment in the next two-and-half years

In Summary

• Donor is a US firm established to help save the lives in developing countries 

• It s also spearheading the Kenya Paediatric Fellowship Programme

Clinton Health Access Initiative East and Southern Africa VP Gerald Macharia and Health PS Susan Mochache
BOOST: Clinton Health Access Initiative East and Southern Africa VP Gerald Macharia and Health PS Susan Mochache
Image: MAGDALINE SAYA

The Health Ministry will receive a Sh450 million boost in the fight against cancer.

The funds from the Clinton Health Access Initiative (Chai) will go towards cancer screening and treatment in the next two-and-half years.

Chai is an American firm established to help save the lives of millions of people living with HIV/Aids in developing countries by scaling up antiretroviral treatment.

 

Chai East and Southern Africa vice president Gerald Macharia on Wednesday met with Health PS Susan Mochache to explore the strategies for halting cancer deaths in the country.

The programme aims to scale up both primary and secondary cancer prevention.

“Cancer is among the leading causes of death in Kenya and reversing cancer deaths will be a big win for the universal health coverage goal,” Mochache said.

Chai is also spearheading the Kenya Paediatric Fellowship Programme through which 141 specialists in paediatric, maternal and newborn health will be trained.

The programme, expected to kick off in September, will be implemented through strategic partnerships with learning institutions to bridge the gap in paediatric sub-specialities in public hospitals to increase access to quality specialised care.

Chai has a long history of support to the ministry in the areas of maternal and child health, family planning, HIV care and treatment, vaccines, assistive technology and vaccines.

Mochache appreciated the support and assured of the ministry’s support in the implementation of the programmes.

 

Cancer continues to afflict more people despite major progress in proposed treatments.

In Kenya, the disease ranks third as a cause of death, after infectious and cardiovascular diseases.

The International Agency for Research on Cancer’s Globocan 2018 data shows that the disease kills 18,772 women and 14,215 men yearly.

Doctors link the high death rates to late diagnosis, shame in seeking treatment, low income and fear of being diagnosed with it. 

Edited by R.Wamochie