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IMPORTED IN 2016

MPs to inspect Sh800m portable health clinics

Sh330 million will be needed for transportation to various sites and for medical supplies

In Summary

•Committee wants to confirm whether the clinics are equipped as claimed by the Ministry or are just shells

•Health docket wanted the inspection done next week, according to the chairperson

Police officers patrols around some the portable container clinics at the NYS yard in Mombasa.
Police officers patrols around some the portable container clinics at the NYS yard in Mombasa.
Image: ERNEST CORNEL

The National Assembly health committee will today inspect the 99 mobile clinics gathering dust and rusting in Mombasa.

The Sh800 million project led to a major scandal in government in 2016, infamously known as Mafya House. 

Estama Investment Limited was awarded the lucrative tender for 100 portable clinics. One clinic had been taken for a demonstration in Nairobi.

 

The Sabina Chege-led committee wants to confirm whether the clinics imported in 2015 are equipped as claimed by the ministry or are just shells.

"The ministry had in their budget asked for funds to transport these clinics. The committee decided to inspect them and ascertain whether they have the equipment or they are white elephants," Chege said. She spoke to the Star on the phone on Wednesday.

Health PS Susan Mochache told Parliament last month that Sh330 million will be needed for transportation to various sites and for medical supplies.

She said the ministry projected about Sh336 million per annum to run the clinics.

There have been alleged attempts by the ministry to block the inspection.

A source in the committee confided that Health officials said there were no cranes to lower the clinics which are in the form of a container.

The committee found the reason inconceivable and went ahead with the inspection.

Chege, however, downplayed the claims.

She said the committee wrote a letter to the ministry informing them of the intended visit.

“We had to get permission from them since they are in possession of the keys to the containers,” Chege said.

Chege said the ministry, however, requested to be allowed more time to get the cranes.

The Health docket wanted the inspection done next week, according to the chairperson.

The committee, nevertheless, resolved to do a random check which will not necessitate a crane.

Informal settlements were the expected beneficiaries of the clinics.

Mombasa, Kisumu, Nairobi, and Murang’a were marked recipients.

Kericho, Nakuru, Uasin Gishu, Elgeyo-Marakwet, Nandi and Makueni were to get the clinics, too.

Nairobi and Nakuru were to have the highest delivery of 20 containers each.

Mombasa’s and Makueni figures stood at six and three containers respectively.

Chege accused the ministry of denying counties access to the clinics.

“If the Health docket has no transportation money, then they should allow counties in need of the clinics to pick them at their own cost,” she said.

The Murang’a women representative said the clinics were costly and should not remain unused.

The clinics are to offer services that include maternal and child health, emergency, outpatient, post-rape care, HIV/TB care, family planning, immunization, growth monitoring, and laboratory.