FOOD SECURITY

Over 2,000 galla goats donated to West Pokot farmers

The goats mature at around six months quicker than the local breed which take one year

In Summary
  • KCSAP coordinator Philip Tingáa warned the groups against selling or slaughtering the galla goats, saying they are meant for breeding purposes.
  • "When the goats mature they will be sold at Sh6,000 compared to the local smaller breeds that fetch Sh3,000,” Ting’aa said.
West Pokot Governor John Lonyangapuo hands over the goat to a beneficiary.
FOOD SECURITY: West Pokot Governor John Lonyangapuo hands over the goat to a beneficiary.
Image: MARYANN CHAI

The Kenya smart project in partnership with the West Pokot government has donated 1,095 hybrid galla goats to 600 farmers to help improve their breeds.

Some 2,991 goats have been donated since the programme was initiated in the region.

Governor John Lonyangapuo said the programme is part of his manifesto to improve breeds and help farmers reap more from the venture.

Lonyangapuo spoke on Saturday at Nasukuta, West Pokot after handing over the goats to farmers in 18 common interest groups.

He said the programme will help boost food security.

The governor said the galla goats’ project is one of the agriculture value chains programmes by the national government and West Pokot.

It is being implemented through the Kenya Climate-Smart Agriculture Project aimed at increasing agricultural productivity and profitability.

The governor said the galla goat matures and attains market weight at around six months quicker than the local breed which take one year for a farmer to get cash.

He encouraged farmers to engage in more climate-smart activities that will enable them get cash to cater for their families.

“We have tried as a county in fighting malnutrition, hunger, poverty and improving food security. We now need to focus on job creation and improving livelihoods,” he said.

Agriculture executive Geoffrey Lipale lauded KCSAP project saying it has helped address agricultural productivity and build resilience-integrated small-scale farming.

KCSAP coordinator Philip Tingáa warned the groups against selling or slaughtering the galla goats, saying they are meant for breeding purposes.

“The goats are only to be used as `seed’. Let’s keep the goats well so that in future we totally eradicate indigenous breeds,” he said.

"When the goats mature they will be sold at Sh6,000 compared to the local smaller breeds that fetch Sh3,000,” Ting’aa said.

Moses Mnangát, a beneficiary lauded the project, saying the rare and resilient galla goats are able to survive drought and yield more milk.

He said they also have a higher resistance to opportunistic diseases that eliminate local goats due to weak immunity.

Another beneficiary, Loice Chepkemoi said the galla goat will help improve their livelihoods since the breed matures faster and attract good prices in a competitive market.

The goats were bought from Wajir county and were all vaccinated against diseases before they were donated to farmers for breeding.

Farmers from Alale, Sekerr, Endugh, Sook and Lomut wards benefited from the distribution.

(Edited by Bilha Makokha)