ACCUSED

Mandera residents lament rising filth in town

Area business community and hospitals are dumping rubbish indiscriminately, they claim.

In Summary

• Mohamed Adow, a resident of Border Point 1 said that the rubbish had become a health risk to residents due to the stench from the site.

• He said their livestock was eating the rubbish and dying or contracting diseases.

Mandera Governor Ali Roba speaking at a past function.
Mandera Governor Ali Roba speaking at a past function.
Image: STEPHEN ASTARIKO

Mandera residents have accused the county government of failing to properly manage waste disposal in the town.

 The residents claim area business community and hospitals are dumping rubbish indiscriminately.

Mohamed Adow, a resident of Border Point 1 said that the rubbish had become a health risk to residents due to the stench from the site.

 

He said their livestock was eating the rubbish and dying while others were contracting diseases.

Another resident Mariam Hussein said children are also at risk as they play with the rubbish which at times fly into their houses.

“Our children are blowing condoms from the rubbish heaps thinking they are balloons. In this part of the world our people have not been exposed to condoms,”  Hussein said.

The residents want the government to take action and prevent further dumping and recollect the waste to a designated area.

The National Environment Management Authority county director of environment Fatuma Maalim said her organisation was aware of the waste menace.

Maalim said the waste management function has been devolved but advised residents to dump waste at designated sites.

She said she will follow up on the matter and prevent further environmental degradation.

 

The town, just like others in northeastern have been grappling with increased solid waste, especially plastic bottles.

Organic garbage and clogged drains also increase the risk of disease outbreaks, threatening the lives of residents and their livestock.

The waste clogs drainage system, causing flooding during the rainy season.

In March, deputy governor Mohamed Arai while flagging off new garbage collection trucks urged area residents to take responsibility for their town and keep it clean.

He said any person caught throwing litter will be arrested, charged and forced to pay a fine.

In 2016, Mandera was hit by a cholera outbreak. Hundreds of residents were affected and 19 people died.

(edited by O. Owino)